Review: Opening The HP 98 Black Print Cartridge C9364W – Inside HP Ink Cartridge

Inside the HP 98 black inkjet print cartridge.

Avoid this cartridge if possible – HP 96, and HP 94 better value.

The HP 98 ink cartridge is a “half-full” black ink cartridge which is often paired with a tri-color cartridge (like the HP 97 – opened here, or the HP 95 cracked open here). The sponge inside this cartridge is the same size as the cartridge, so refilling is very simple.  Holes are already present.

Inside an HP, Hewlett Packard, inkjet print cartridge ink - HP 98 black low capacity black ink.

Cartridge Number Pages Retail Cost Per Print
HP 92 Black Inkjet Print Cartridge (C9362W) 220 $14.99 .07
HP 98 Black Inkjet Print Cartridge (C9364W) 420 $23.99 .06
HP 94 Black Inkjet Print Cartridge (C8765W) 480 $23.99 .05
HP 96 Black Inkjet Print Cartridge (C8767W) 860 $33.99 .04

You can take these page yield numbers with a grain of salt.  HP even admits as much:

Actual yield varies considerably based on content of printed pages and other factors. Some ink from included cartridge is used to start up the printer. For more information see: Inkjet page yields

A more realistic expectation on page yield for these cartridges is about half of what Hewlett Packard (HP) claims on their page yields above.  We also looked for “street” prices – prices you can expect to pay for these cartridges online:

Cartridge Number Pages Street Cost Per Print
HP 92 Black Inkjet Print Cartridge (C9362W) 110 $13.19 .12
HP 98 Black Inkjet Print Cartridge (C9364W) 210 $21.99 .11
HP 94 Black Inkjet Print Cartridge (C8765W) 240 $20.82 .09
HP 96 Black Inkjet Print Cartridge (C8767W) 430 $24.99 .06

So as you can see, if you need a black ink cartridge, make it the HP 94 cartridge, or even better, the HP 96 cartridge for the best value.

HP 98 black ink cartridge sponge. HP 98 ink cartridge - black sponge. HP 98 black ink cartridge - sponge refill removed.

Cartridge Specifications:

Color: Black
Part Number: HP 98 C9364W
Ink Type: Pigment based ink
HP 98 Ink Volume: 10ml*
Page Yield: 420 pages**

Ink Drop Size: 14.5pl

Retail price: $23.99
Street price: $21.97

** that 420 page estimate is from HP and based on 5% coverage (see what 5% coverage really looks like) – needless to say, manufacturer estimates are always on the “high side.” HP even admits as much…

This cartridge is often paired with the tri-color HP 95 (cracked open here), or the “high capacity” color 97 ink cartridge (cracked open here).

For You Refillers:

Inside an HP ink cartridge - The HP 98 black ink cartridge inside. HP 98 black ink cartridge refill hole locations. HP 98 black ink cartridge sponge - refill hole locations.

Refilling is easy if you know where to put the refilling needle. There are five (5) holes already in the cartridge lid which are covered up by the cartridge number sticker. As you can see from the other images, there is black ink around only three (3) of the holes. We suggest using one of those three (3) holes since they are closer to the ink exit point. All the other two holes are there to confuse refillers. This cartridge will hold around 18-21ml of ink, which is a good amount for a modern ink cartridge.

Where to refill the HP 98 black ink cartridge.

Contact! – Contact!

These solder points, or contacts help make up the print head. Printers that use these types of cartridges do not have an internal print head – rather the print head is located on the cartridges themselves. If print quality declines to the point where the cartridge is no longer usable, simply try another cartridge (it’s like getting a new printer). If your cartridge cannot be recognized, give the contacts a quick clean with a damp cloth, or other device and try again. If the contacts are harmed, the cartridge may not function at all.

HP 98 black ink cartridge cartridge contacts - solder points - copper leads.

The Print Head:

Unlike Epson, which makes the printhead part of the printer, Hewlett Packard (HP) puts the print head technology on the cartridge (for most of their consumer printers). This means every time you buy a new cartridge, it’s like getting a new printer. This is why these type of HP printers (that use this cartridge style) last forever in our opinion. As long as the mechanics of the printer keep working it will last forever since the print head can simply be replaced by installing a new cartridge into the printer.

Not all HP printers and cartridges use this style (print head on the cartridge) of build, but a large majority of the ones you will find at Wal-Mart, Target, Best Buy, and other discount (online) retailers use these cartridges.

Notice the 2D UPC code on the print head ribbon.

Print hed for the HP 98 black ink inkjet print cartridge - crcked open to reveal the inside of the cartridge.

Is this an embedded expiration date?

Yet another 2D UPC code on the outside front of the cartridge. So that is 3 total on a single cartridge. If (HP) Hewlett Packard went to the trouble of putting them on there, you can bet they are there for a reason. HP claims there is no built-in “self-destruct” expiration date for their cartridges. Read more about it here…

http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?docname=c01764161&cc=us&dlc=en&lc=en

HP 98 black ink cartridge expiration date and serial number.

Specifications for the HP 98 (C9364W) black ink cartridge:

http://h10010.www1.hp.com/wwpc/us/en/sm/WF06c/A10-12771-64199-69422-69422-457365-457386-457390.html

Information about HP 98 black inkjet print cartridge page yields here:

http://h10060.www1.hp.com/pageyield/en-019/searchResults.html?cCode=us,st=cartridge,ss=98

Compatible with the following HP printers:

Several of these printers can take 2-3 different types of cartridges (both color and black), so make sure you know what your printer is capable of using.  The HP 92, HP 94, HP 96, and HP 98 are all black cartridges that may work in your printer.  Knowing which cartridge is the most full (best value) can help you determine what type of printer to purchase.

Review: Opening The HP 99 Photo Print Cartridge C9369W – Inside HP Ink Cartridge

Inside the HP 99 photo inkjet print cartridge.

Wanna print 6-color photos on your HP 4-color printer? HP has the answer, the HP 99 cartridge is designed to give the user 6-color photo prints when combined with a tri-color inkjet print color cartridge.

HP 99 photo color ink cartridge for (HP) Hewlett Packard inkjet printers.

A look inside the HP 99 ink cartridge – internal structure:

The HP 99 ink cartridge is a strange bird – designed to be used with a tr-color cartridge (like the HP 97 – opened here, or the HP 95 cracked open here)  to print 6-color photos with your HP printer.  This cartridge contains three (3) colors – black, photo cyan, and photo magenta.  This is *not* the cartridge you want for printing large volumes of text, or black only documents – since the black ink is inside this cartridge shares space with two (2) other colors, the back ink will run out quickly.

Removing the cartridge cover on the HP 99 photo color ink cartridge from Hewlett Packard - inkjet print cartridges.

Specifications:

Color: Black
Part Number: C9369W- HP 99 Photo
Ink Type: Dye based ink
HP 99 Ink Volume: 21ml*
Page Yield: 130 4×6 photos**

Ink Drop Size: 15pl

Retail price: $28.99
Street price: $13.18

*7ml per color (black, photo cyan, and photo magenta)

** that 130 page estimate is from HP and based on 5% coverage (see what 5% coverage really looks like) – needless to say, manufacturer estimates are always on the “high side.”

This cartridge is often paired with the HP 95, or HP 97 tri-color ink cartridge to offer 6-color photo printing.

For You Refillers:

Don’t remove the label – there are air channels on the top of the cartridge that need to be maintained – best way to refill is to just stick a syringe (needle) full of ink into one of the pre-drilled holes that are in the cartridge.

A look inside an HP ink cartridge - the HP 99 photo color ink cartridge. A look inside the internal structure of the (HP) Hewlett Packard ink cartridge - HP 99 photo ink. Hewlett Packard (HP) photo ink cartridge 99 - inside the ink cartridge, or where to refill your HP ink cartridge.

Refilling is easy if you know where to put the refilling needle.  There are five (5) holes already in the cartridge lid which are covered up by the cartridge number sticker.  As you can see from the other images, there is black ink around only three (3) of the holes. We suggest using one of those three (3) holes since they are closer to the ink exit point.  All the other two holes  are there to confuse refillers.  This cartridge will hold around 18-21ml of ink, which is a good amount for a modern ink cartridge.

Where to refill the HP 99 photo ink cartridge.

Contact! – Contact!

These solder points, or contacts help make up the print head.  Printers that use these types of cartridges do not have an internal print head – rather the print head is located on the cartridges themselves.  If print quality declines to the point where the cartridge is no longer usable, simply try another cartridge (it’s like getting a new printer).  If your cartridge cannot be recognized, give the contacts a quick clean with a damp cloth, or other device and try again.  If the contacts are harmed, the cartridge may not function at all.

Inside the HP Hewlett Packard - 99 picture photo ink cartridge.

The Print Head:

Unlike Epson, which makes the printhead part of the printer, Hewlett Packard (HP) puts the print head technology on the cartridge (for most of their consumer printers).  This means every time you buy a new cartridge, it’s like getting a new printer.  This is why these type of HP printers (that use this cartridge style) last forever in our opinion.  As long as the mechanics of the printer keep working it will last forever since the print head can simply be replaced by installing a new cartridge into the printer.

Not all HP printers and cartridges use this style (print head on the cartridge) of build, but a large majority of the ones you will find at Wal-Mart, Target, Best Buy, and other discount (online) retailers use these cartridges.

Notice the 2D UPC code on the print head ribbon.

Inside HP inkjet printer cartridges - a look inside the sealed ink cartridges from HP 99 photo color.

Is this an embedded expiration date?

Yet another 2D UPC code on the outside front of the cartridge.  So that is 3 total on a single cartridge.  If (HP) Hewlett Packard went to the trouble of putting them on there, you can bet they are there for a reason.  HP claims there is no built-in “self-destruct” expiration date for their cartridges.  Read more about it here…

http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?docname=c01764161&cc=us&dlc=en&lc=en

HP 99 photo ink cartridge - expiration date, and serial number of the cartridge.

When to use this cartridge (HP 99):

Use this cartridge when printing photos only – the HP 99 photo cartridge is rated at 130 4×6 prints.  At its current price, this cartridge is not a bad deal for printing photos, however the photo quality will not be professional level (fine for home use).  If printing 130 photos at a time sounds daunting, try and preserve the cartridge for future use (using a cartridge clip, available on eBay or Amazon – or here) by removing it from the printer.  Easily refilled, but not practical for everyday use.

Note: cartridge clips are included with some refill kits like the InkTec brand.  Good kits in our experience.

Specifications for the HP 99 (C9369W) photo ink cartridge:

http://h10010.www1.hp.com/wwpc/us/en/sm/WF06c/A10-12771-64199-69422-69422-397452-397454-397458.html

Information about HP cartridge page yields here:

http://h10060.www1.hp.com/pageyield/en-019/searchResults.html?cCode=us,st=cartridge,ss=99

Hewlett Packard HP 99 sponge sponges ink cartridge cartridges.  Internal structure of the HP 99 ink cartridge.

Compatible with the following HP printers:

You can use this cartridge for photo printing, however avoid using this cartridge for everyday printing.  As mentioned above, this cartridge is only one-third (1/3) black ink – the other two chambers are for photo cyan, and photo magenta.

Review: Inside The HP 74 (CB335W) Black Inkjet Print Cartridge (Cracked Open)

Cracked open – the HP 74 (CB335WN) inkjet print cartridge.

This is an older cartridge from Hewlett Packard, and it sheds some light on the multiple cartridge strategy HP (and all the other printer manufacturers) are now employing in full force (same cartridges, just differing amounts of ink, and different prices).  The HP 74 black ink cartridge looks like all the other HP ink cartridges (from the outside), but what does it look like on this inside of the ink cartridge?

This cartridge contains about 5ml of ink.  However, it has the room to  take much more ink – but then HP would have to raise that $14.99 price point (like they do on the larger, and “full” HP 74XL cartridge which has three (3) times the amount of ink but only costs $20.00 street.). The HP 74 represents a mistake by HP, and one of the last times HP released a “standard” cartridge with a full sized sponge.  The larger the sponge, the more ink the cartridge can take when refilling, or when re-manufacturing.  This is not good for HP’s consumption model marketing.  In HP’s future cartridge manufacturing – if the cartridge price is lower, the cartridge can be altered internally and include a smaller sponge (see inside the newer HP 60, and HP 901 black ink cartridges and you will see what we mean).

HP hewlett packard ink cartridge cover removed to reveal the internal structure of the HP 74 black inkjet print cartridge.

Specifications:

Color: Black
Part Number: CB335W – HP 74 Black
Ink Type: Pigment based ink
HP 74 Ink Volume: 3-5ml
Page Yield: 200 pages*

Ink Drop Size: 15pl

Retail price: $14.99
Street price: $13.18

* that 200 page estimate is from HP and based on 5% coverage (see what 5% coverage really looks like) – needless to say, manufacturer estimates are always on the “high side.”

This cartridge is often paired with the HP 75, or 75XL tri-color ink cartridge which we cracked open here.

A Refillers Dream – A New Reality:

Ink stop and cartridge world are not was well eastablished in the industry - goodbye consumer options.

This is the kind of cartridge that kept Cartridge World, and Ink Stop in business.  That is until inkstop went out of business.  This cartridge type is cheap to buy initially, however it runs out fast (40-100 pages at most).  Can be easily “over filled” reliably up to 2-3 times (maybe more, your mileage will vary)  with three times the amount of black ink the cartridge originally came with.  Better to get this cartridge refilled, or refill (400 pgs +), than to buy new (40-100 pgs).  No comparison really.

HP will fix this “problem” with the release of the HP 60, and HP 901 ink cartridges that have a smaller sponge, and space inside the cartridge blocked off – not feasible to refill.

HP is aware of the solution – working on another problem.

HP is not stupid.  We have heard rumors in the industry that the current “flagship” HP cartridge type (the HP 74 and to many otHewlett Packard HP 901, 901XL, XL Ink Cartridge Refillshers to list, but of the same design) cost HP over one Billion dollars to engineer.  The cartridge is flimsy, and designed to fail – it must not be easy to get engineers to design something to fail.  While the cartridge can be refilled, reliably, several times – great care must be given to the condition of the ink cartridge.

These cartridges must be refilled before they run out of ink – the contacts need to be kept from damage (think static discharge, dirt, and ink covering the contacts), and the print head needs to be kept clean.  These cartridge characteristics conspire against the casual refiller, and consumer demand for refill kits and refilled cartridges is low.  Garbage in = garbage out – if the cartridge is designed to fail, any additional use after the cartridge “runs dry” should be considered a bonus.

So what is under the label on the cartridge?

Cartridge design for the HP 74 black inkjet print cartridge.Pay special attention to the many holes and air-flow channels – that stuff is there for a reason.  This cartridge can be easily refilled with a bottle of ink and a simple syringe and needle.  The holes are already in the top of the cartridge.  No special tools needed to “drill” a hole in the top of the HP ink cartridge.

Three (3) barriers to simple refilling:

1: The pesky ink monitor.

Printers that use this cartridge series remember the last two cartridge serial numbers.  The cartridge can be re-used, however it will show as empty in the print monitor, and unless turned off, the user is prompted to replace the cartridge at every printing.  Very annoying when trying to print driving directions on the way out the door.

The printer “remembers” the current cartridge – plus one.  So to reset the ink monitor, three cartridges must be used. Hassle.

There are other ways around the ink monitor issue – press a series of buttons on the printer – but they vary by cartridge and by printer model number.

2: Failure of cartridge

If a cartridge is not refilled shortly *before* going empty (for this series of cartridge) the sponge can dry out, the print head can become clogged, or the contacts can get ink on them – or worse damaged.

There are just to many things that can go wrong for wide-scale acceptance.  Experienced refillers are aware of the limitations refilling presents, and take precautions.  First time refillers, or the “average consumer” might not be aware of these limitations and-or care.  A cartridge must work when called upon, and there is a price for reliability.  Sometimes the cartridge will not work period – or it fails after a short refilled life.  There are also cases of a refilled cartridge lasting “forever.”  The refilling game really is part know-how, but equal parts blind luck as no two cartridges are the same.

3: It’s messy.

There is the perception that refilling is messy, because It *can-be* if you are not sure of what you are doing. Frankly, sometimes it goes all wrong. The majority of the time it goes well, and with the savings i can buy a new pair of pants anyway.  A non-issue for committed refillers, a reason to take it to walgreens for some.

A look at the sponges tells the story:

Below we have the HP 74 black and HP 74xl black ink cartridge sponges.

See how little ink is in the HP 74 black ink cartridge when compared to the HP 74XL black inkjet print  (full of ink) cartridge.

The HP 74 black ink cartridge sponge compared to the HP 74XL black ink cartridge sponge. The 74XL sponge (and cartridge) is much larger.

For You Refillers:

Refilling is easy if you know where to put the refilling needle.  There are five (5) holes already in the cartridge lid which are covered up by the cartridge number sticker.  As you can see from the other images, there is black ink around only three (3) of the holes. We suggest using one of those three (3) holes since they are closer to the ink exit point.  All the other two holes  are there to confuse refillers.  This cartridge will hold around 18-21ml of ink, which is a good amount for a modern ink cartridge.

Hewlett Packard (HP) 74 black inkjet printer cartridge refill hole locations.

Compatible Cartridges:

HP 74, 74XL compatible ink cartridgesCompatible cartridges are an option here. Basically a re-manufactured (compatible) cartridge is just a professionally refilled, or “refilled for you” cartridge. The will run about 30%-40% less than HP brand ink cartridges, and if you can find a quality vendor, contrary to HPs claims the work great.

These re-manufactured cartridges will get cheaper as more become available in the aftermarket. When you buy a new printer, more often than not, it will include new cartridges, and until these cartridges make their way into the 3rd party cartridge re-manufacturers the price will be high. As the supply of quality empties increases, prices will decrease (in some cases by as much as 70%) and the compatible cartridge becomes a solid choice in the cost per page battle.

Contact! – Contact!

These solder points, or contacts help make up the print head.  Printers that use these types of cartridges do not have an internal print head – rather the print head is located on the cartridges themselves.  If print quality declines to the point where the cartridge is no longer usable, simply try another cartridge (it’s like getting a new printer).  If your cartridge cannot be recognized, give the contacts a quick clean with a damp cloth, or other device and try again.  If the contacts are harmed, the cartridge may not function at all.

HP 74 ink cartridge contacts - hp 74 printer ink carridge print head contacts.

The Print Head:

Unlike Epson, which makes the printhead part of the printer, Hewlett Packard (HP) puts the print head technology on the cartridge (for most of their consumer printers).  This means every time you buy a new cartridge, it’s like getting a new printer.  This is why these type of HP printers (that use this cartridge style) last forever in our opinion.  As long as the mechanics of the printer keep working it will last forever since the print head can simply be replaced by installing a new cartridge into the printer.

Not all HP printers and cartridges use this style (print head on the cartridge) of build, but a large majority of the ones you will find at Wal-Mart, Target, Best Buy, and other discount (online) retailers use these cartridges.

Notice the 2D UPC code on the print head ribbon.

HP 901 black inkjet print cartridge empty and opened up to expose internal structure of ink cartridge

Is this an embedded expiration date?

Yet another 2D UPC code on the outside front of the cartridge.  So that is 3 total on a single cartridge.  If (HP) Hewlett Packard went to the trouble of putting them on there, you can bet they are there for a reason.  HP claims there is no built-in “self-destruct” expiration date for their cartridges.  Read more about it here…

http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?docname=c01764161&cc=us&dlc=en&lc=en

hp 74 black ink cartridge expiration date, serial number, and upc code

There is really no reason to ever buy this cartridge.  A quick check of Amazon reveals that the 74XL  cartridge (700 pages) will run you $27.99, or about twice what the HP 74 half full cartridge (200 pages) will cost you.  Ultimately, the best advice is to avoid this cartridge (and the printers that work with it) completely – if you print more than 100-200 pages per month.

HP 74 black (CB335WN) specifications:

http://h10010.www1.hp.com/wwpc/us/en/sm/WF06c/A10-12771-64199-69422-69422-3265895-3265896-3265901.html

HP 74 black (CB335W) page yield information:

http://h10060.www1.hp.com/pageyield/en-019/searchResults.html?cCode=us,st=cartridge,ss=CB335W

Compatible with the following HP inkjet printers:

The HP 74 works in a bunch of printers – check out the HP 74XL black ink, a much better value.
  • Deskjet D4200 Series
  • Deskjet D4260
  • Deskjet D4268
  • OfficeJet J5700
  • OfficeJet J5725
  • OfficeJet J5730
  • OfficeJet J5735
  • OfficeJet J5740
  • OfficeJet J5750
  • OfficeJet J5780
  • OfficeJet J5783
  • OfficeJet J5785
  • OfficeJet J5788
  • OfficeJet J5790
  • Photosmart C4200 Series
  • Photosmart C4205
  • Photosmart C4210
  • Photosmart C4240
  • Photosmart C4250
  • Photosmart C4270
  • Photosmart C4272
  • Photosmart C4273
  • Photosmart C4275
  • Photosmart C4280
  • Photosmart C4283
  • PhotoSmart C4285
  • PhotoSmart C4345
  • PhotoSmart C4380
  • PhotoSmart C4580
  • PhotoSmart C4599
  • Photosmart C5200 Series
  • Photosmart C5240
  • Photosmart C5250
  • Photosmart C5280
  • PhotoSmart C5540
  • PhotoSmart C5550
  • PhotoSmart C5580
  • PhotoSmart D5345
  • Photosmart D5360

Cartridges: “New” Epson Cartridge T124 “Alomst Empty” Ink Cartridges

Epson t124120, t124220, t124320, t124420 ink cartridges from Epson - very low amount of ink in this cartridge.New Cartridge – Epson T124 very low ink volume ink.

New printers from Epson means one thing, new cartridges.  Epson has released some new printers recently, and this cartridge (T124120, T124220, T124320, T124420) series contains about 3-5ml of ink and will be good for about 40 pages of color printing.  The black cartridge will last slightly longer if only text is printed.  These cartridges are a joke, and should be avoided at all costs.

The T124 cartridges are the same physical size and shape as the T125 cartridges, but the T124 is about one-third full.

The T124 series ink cartridges work with the following Epson AIO printers:

T124120, T124220, T124320, T124420 ink cartridges for the Epson Stylus NX125, NX127, NX420 wireless

These cartridges come in four (4) different colors:

These cartridges contain a very low amount of ink – look at the T088 Epson cartridge for what you are getting. Cartridges contain 3ml of ink, and are good for maybe 50 pages.

Epson stylus NX125, NX127, NX420 cartridges to avoid - the "half-full" T124 series ink cartridges.

Try to never purchase these cartridges (if you can help it) as they contain very low levels of ink (3ml-5ml) – look to the T125 series ink cartridges we profiled here as a better alternative.  The “more full” T125 series ink cartridges will run you $2.00-$3.00 more but contain twice the amount of ink as these “joke” cartridges.

Epson Stylus NX125 inkjet printer.

NX125

Epson Stylus NX127 inkjet printer.

NX127

Epson Stylus NX420 inkjet printer.

NX420

Cartridges: “New” Epson Ink Cartridge T125 Series

New Epson Ink Cartridge  – T125

Epson stylus ink cartridge T125120, T125220, T125320, T125420 ink cartridgesNew printers from Epson come with a secret feature – a new cartridge (T125 series ink cartridges).  There are four (4) flavors of these cartridges (t125) for Epson’s low-end 4-color all-in-ones like the:

The T125 series cartridges come in 4 flavors, black, cyan (blue), magenta (red), and yellow.

T125 series ink cartridges from Epson - Four (4) in the series.

Cartridges use durabrite pigment based ink resulting in durable inkjet prints.  These printers are fine, but they are identical in function to the previous generation (NX400, NX100, NX110, Workforce 500) of Epson printers, with the exception of wireless printing which is standard on the NX420, and Workforce 520 printers.  If wireless printing is not a big deal for you, then look at some of the other Epson offerings like the NX400, and Workforce 500. The older the printer, the more 3rd party printing choices there are out there.  New printers are impossible to work with – look for coupons and deals.

Pricing and part numbers from the Epson Website.

Epson pricing for the T125, T125120, T125220, T125320, T125420, inkjet print cartridges for the NX420 and others.

New cartridge = New chip.

A new cartridge means (2) two things for those looking for a compatible (cheaper) cartridge – a new chip, and new plastic cartridge molds. It also means that ink cartridges will be hard to find in the first 30-60 days (Epson) of release, and generic cartridges will arrive somewhere in the next 180 days (not available currently).  Epson is employing a two chip configuration on all their cartridges, so the T125 series are almost impossible to refill, and even harder to make “re-manufactured.” Compatible cartridges cannot be imported to the USA (thanks to a legal victory by Epson several years ago), so you will not be seeing compatible or generic cartridges at your local Staples, Office Depot, Target or Walmart.  Look online, and look in about 30-60 days.  If you need cartridges immediately, stay away from the T124 cartridges.

Theses cartridges are identical to their predecessors, but with a new chip, and new plastics to deal with, count on getting ripped off with Epson brand inks for the foreseeable future.

Printers that use the T125 series ink cartridge:

Epson Stylus NX125 inkjet printer.

NX125

Epson Stylus NX127 inkjet printer.

NX127

Epson Stylus NX420 inkjet printer.

NX420

Epson Workforce 520 inkjet printer.

WF 520

Review: Inside The HP 75XL, 75 XL Tri-Color (Color) Inkjet Print Cartridge (Cracked Open)

A look inside the HP 75XL tri-color (color) inkjet print cartridge.

The HP 75XL tri-color (color) ink cartridge is the “full” 75 color cartridge from Hewlett Packard that works in a variety of Officejet and Photosmart  inkjet printers. HP also offers a “half-full” version of this cartridge for $20-$25, simply the HP 75.  The HP 75XL is a good cartridge for the occasional printer and the cartridge can be had for $20 for the HP brand.  If printing at your location is 50-100 pages per month (no pictures), this cartridge is probably not a bad choice.  There are many other terrible choices (HP 92, HP 93, HP 60), and for the occasional photo, or documents in the 50-100 per month range, you could do much worse.

Look for printers that use the HP 74XL, and 75XL (often paired – black, color).  A good compromise for occasional printing.

HP 75XL, 75 XL tri-color ink cartridge.

Sponges are soaked in this cartridge.

A substantial amount of ink (in inkjet printer cartridge terms) is in these cartridges.  The sponges are full of ink.  The lid was (is) stuck on tight, so evaporation should be minimal. Refilling very easy with this cartridge, holes are already in the lid – covered by the cartridge identification number sticker.

HP Hewlett Packard - 75xl tri-color (color) ink cartridge.

Specifications:

Color: Black
Part Number: (CB338WN) – HP 75XL
Ink Type: Dye based color ink
Page Yield: 750 pages*

Ink Drop Size: 5pl

Retail price: $40.99
Street price: $19.99

* that 750 page estimate is from HP and based on 5% coverage (see what 5% coverage really looks like) – needless to say, manufacturer estimates are on the “high side.”

This cartridge is often paired with the HP 74 black, and 74XL black inkjet print cartridge which we cracked open here.

Cartridge Contacts

These solder points, or contacts help make up the print head. Printers that use these types of cartridges do not have an internal print head – rather the print head is located on the cartridges themselves. If print quality declines to the point where the cartridge is no longer usable, simply try another cartridge (it’s like getting a new printer). If your cartridge cannot be recognized, give the contacts a quick clean with a damp cloth, or other device and try again. If the contacts are harmed, the cartridge may not function at all.

HP 75xl tri-color ink cartridge print head contacts - keep them clean to refill your cartridge.

For Refillers:

Refilling is easy if you know where to fill. There are five (5) holes in the cartridge lid. As you can see from the other images, there is black ink around all five (5) of the holes. We suggest using the top most hole since it is closer to where the ink will exit the cartridge. Refill kits can be a hassle, but are worth it if you are on a tight budget and have patience.

HP 75xl color tri-color ink cartridge

HP 75xl color tri-color ink cartridge location of colors inside cartridge.

Is this an embedded expiration date?

Yet another 2D UPC code on the outside front of the cartridge. So that is 3 total on a single cartridge. If (HP) Hewlett Packard went to the trouble of putting them on there, you can bet they are there for a reason. HP claims there is no built-in “self-destruct” expiration date for their cartridges. Read more about it here…

http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?docname=c01764161&cc=us&dlc=en&lc=en

HP 75xl expiration date silk screened onto the cartridge - HP.com website says this is no big deal.

HP 75 And HP 75XL Compared:

There really is no comparison. The HP 75 black ink cartridge (on the left), or the “standard” cartridge as HP refers to it has two things wrong with it. First, the sponge is one-sixth the size as the 75 XL, and it is contained in a plastic divide to deter refillers.  Second, you can refill it, but look at what little ink the mini-sponge will take. The HP 75 “standard” cartridge will require constant attention to maintain it’s “full” status.

The HP 74 retails for $14.99, and the HP 74XL retails for around $33.99, but deals can be had on this older cartridge. If you print more than 50 pages per month, do yourself a favor and stick with the XL cartridges – they have more ink and are more re-fillable, and are a better cost per page value.

HP 74 black and HP 75XL tri-color ink cartridges compared.

HP 75xl color tri-color inkjet print cartridge compared t0 HP 74 black ink cartridge.

Tip – a better value is the HP 74XL black (21ml).  The HP 74 black ink cartridge contains a measly 5ml of ink.

Large capacity ink cartridges from HP - the HP 74XL black ink cartridge compared with the HP 75xl tri-color (color) ink cartridge.

HP 74xl (full) black ink cartridge compared to the HP 75xl tri-color ink color cartridge

Refill kits are available:

HP 75xl tri-color, color ink cartridge refill.As you can see from the images, this cartridge is very easy to refill. One negative to refilling is that the ink monitor will no longer function, so it is impossible to tell when the ink is going to run out. This is not a huge deal as the cartridge can be topped off every so often – never let a cartridge run all the way out. If the sponge can get dry, and if ink stops flowing properly the cartridge will not provide an acceptable print.

The HP 75XL cartridge is rated at 560 pages, so that equates to about 21ml of ink (7ml per color). The sponge is not all the way soaked as received from HP, however count on the cartridge taking at least 7ml of each color ink.  Refill kits are easy to use, and result in $3.00-$4.00 cartridges.

Compatible Cartridges:

HP 74, 74XL compatible ink cartridgesCompatible cartridges are an option for this cartridge. Basically a re-manufactured (compatible) cartridge is just a professionally refilled, or “refilled for you” cartridge. The will run about 30%-40% less than HP brand ink cartridges, and if you can find a quality vendor, contrary to HPs claims the work great.

These re-manufactured cartridges will get cheaper as more become available in the aftermarket. When you buy a new printer, more often than not, it will include new cartridges, and until these cartridges make their way into the 3rd party cartridge re-manufacturers the rice will be high. As the supply of quality empties increases, prices will decrease (in some cases by as much as 70%) and the compatible cartridge becomes a solid choice in the cost per page battle. Animated gif goodness.

Refilling HP ink cartridges - HP inkjet print cartridge refill locations for color HP 75xl tri-color ink carridge

The Print Head:

The printhead *will* wear out or get clogged, its just a matter of time. There is no hard data, but the accepted rule is a cartridge can be refilled 3-4 times before it needs to be replaced with a new one. A new “full” cartridge purchase is not always necessary (74XL retails for $. Empties can be had for cheap on eBay, so look there. Also check Amazon for a good selection of prices.

Unlike Epson, which makes the printhead part of the printer, Hewlett Packard (HP) puts the print head technology on the physical cartridge (for 80% of their consumer printers). This means every time you buy a new cartridge, it’s like getting a new print head. This is why these type of HP printers (that use this cartridge style) last forever in our opinion. As long as the mechanics of the printer keep working it will last forever since the print head can simply be replaced by installing a new cartridge into the printer.

Not all HP printers and cartridges use this style (print head on the cartridge) of build, but a large majority of the ones you will find at Wal-Mart, Target, and other discount retailers use these cartridges.

Notice the 2D UPC code on the print head ribbon. They are actually in three places on the cartridge – the top label, the print head, and on the front facing side (expiration).

HP 75XL printhead for inkjet print cartridge.

Hewlett Packard (HP) 75XL tri-color (color) ink cartridge page estimates:

http://h10060.www1.hp.com/pageyield/en-019/searchResults.html?cCode=us,st=cartridge,ss=CB338W

Hewlett Packard (HP) 75XL tri-color (color) inkjet print cartridge specifications:

http://h10010.www1.hp.com/wwpc/us/en/sm/WF06c/A10-12771-64199-69422-69422-3266753-3266779-3266784.html

This cartridge is compatible with the following HP Deskjet, Officejet, and Photosmart inkjet printers:

Cartridges: New Canon Ink Cartridges – CLI-226 Colors, PGI-225 Black

“Augmenting” the Canon ink cartridge line.

CLI ink cartridges from Canon have not really changed much over the life of the ink cartridge.

When any printer manufacturer releases new printers, it usually means new cartridges too.  Welcome the new CLI-226, and PGI-225 ink cartridges from Canon.

Pay me now consumerThis *also* means if you plan on “upgrading” in the next 6-8 months, make sure to use up all your current ink cartridges.  Canon invented the individual ink tank market with the old BCI-6, and BCI-3 ink cartridges – which were Canon’s flagship cartridge(s) for over 6 years.  Fast forward to 2010, and aggressive revenue generating plans have resulted in Canon releasing three (3) – three! – new ink cartridges in the past 3 years. The cartridges are ink tanks, nothing more; there is no “great technology” on the cartridge itself, so there is practically no reason to change the cartridge. Unless…the prevalence of compatible cartridge usage, refilling, and other 3rd party inking methods are getting more popular, and more widely accepted. Just asking.

Smart LED with Canon logo to let you know it’s installed correctly.

Should really read – special “microchip” attached so we can punish consumers by rendering the ink monitor useless if you want to refill your cartridge, and using scare tactics when it comes to 3rd party solutions.

Downgrading of the Canon ink cartridge

So the CLI-8 and PGI-5 cartridges needed “downgrading” by Canon to the CLI-221 and PGI-220 (very tiny) ink cartridges.  We now must welcome the CLI-226 and PGI-225 cartridges to the fold.  They look the same, act the same, and perform the same function as their predecessors. To bad the plastics are keyed differently and different chips are used.  No word on chip resetters for these cartridges.

PGI-225, and CLI-226 ink cartridges available on the Canon eStore:

Canon cli-225, and cli-226 inkjet print cartridges for the Pixma iP4280.

The PGI-225 pigment black (larger black cartridge), and the CLI-226 color cartridges (including individual photo black, cyan, magenta, and yellow cartridges).

New cartridges include the following.  The printers in this series typically use five (5) individual ink cartridges – the larger black cartridge (PGI-225) contains 19ml of pigment based black ink. The “colors” (CLI-226) which includes a photo black, cyan, magenta, and yellow cartridge contain 9ml ink, and are physically smaller than the PGI-225 cartridge.

Ink Tanks: PGI-225 Pigment Black CLI-226 (Cyan/Magenta/Yellow/Black)

Seems reasonable at first glance, but what about when you make a set – that is over $50.00 for a set of ink (essentially a black and color cartridge) – look at what they did the last time Canon changed cartridges:

New CLI-220 Canon cartridges are MUCH smaller than the previous CLI-8 series.

These cartridges are compatible with the following Canon inkjet printers:

Expect there to be shortages on these cartridges when these printers first hit the market in full.