Review – Opening The HP 74XL 74 XL (Full) Inkjet Print Cartridge (Cracked Open)

A look inside the HP 74XL black inkjet print cartridge.

A look inside the internal structure of an HP inkjet cartridge.  The HP 74XL cartridge is physically larger than the HP 74, or even the HP 75XL inkjet print cartridges.  It contains 21ml of ink, and is one of the best “cartridges” to use.  Cost per page printing is much improved with the HP 74XL ink cartridge from HP.  Look around for pricing – this is an older cartridge, and the $34.99 retail price can be beat.

Retail price for the HP 74XL inkjet print cartridge - black.

The HP 74XL inkjet print cartridge looks the same as the HP 96 (no XL designation but it was *the* cartridge to have not to long ago). The cartridge is physically larger than the cheaper (and about one-third the ink) HP 74 black ink cartridge, which we cracked open here.

Removing the top cover of the HP 74xl large black ink cartridge - a look at the internal structure of an inkjet printer cartridge.

Specifications:

Color: Black
Part Number: (CB336WN) – HP 74XL
Ink Type: Pigment based ink
Page Yield: 750 pages*

Ink Drop Size: 15pl

Retail price: $34.99
Street price: $19.99

* that 750 page estimate is from HP and based on 5% coverage (see what 5% coverage really looks like) – needless to say, manufacturer estimates are on the “high side.”

This cartridge is often paired with the HP 75, and 75XL tri-color inkjet print (color) cartridge which we cracked open here.

HP 74XL ink cartridge opened with lid off to reveal the internal structure of the cartridge.

Cartridge Contacts

These solder points, or contacts help make up the print head.  Printers that use these types of cartridges do not have an internal print head – rather the print head is located on the cartridges themselves.  If print quality declines to the point where the cartridge is no longer usable, simply try another cartridge (it’s like getting a new printer).  If your cartridge cannot be recognized, give the contacts a quick clean with a damp cloth, or other device and try again.  If the contacts are harmed, the cartridge may not function at all.

HP 74xl black inkjet print cartridge print head contacts.

For Refillers:

Refilling is easy if you know where to fill.  There are seven (7) holes in the cartridge lid.  As you can see from the other images, there is black ink around all five (5) of the holes. We suggest using the top most hole since it is closer to where the ink will exit the cartridge. Refill kits can be a hassle, but are worth it if you are on a tight budget and have patience.

Refill holes for the HP 74XL black inkjet print cartridge.

Is this an embedded expiration date?

Yet another 2D UPC code on the outside front of the cartridge.  So that is 3 total on a single cartridge.  If (HP) Hewlett Packard went to the trouble of putting them on there, you can bet they are there for a reason.  HP claims there is no built-in “self-destruct” expiration date for their cartridges.  Read more about it here…

http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?docname=c01764161&cc=us&dlc=en&lc=en

HP 74xl inkjet print cartridge expiration date on the actual cartridge itself!

HP 74 And HP 74XL Compared:

There really is no comparison.  The HP 74 black ink cartridge (on the left), or the “standard” cartridge as HP refers to it has two things wrong with it.  First, the sponge is one-sixth the size as the 74XL, and it is contained in a plastic divide to deter refillers.  Second, you can refill it, but look at what little ink the mini-sponge will take.  The HP 74 cartridge will require constant attention to maintain it’s “full” status.

The HP 74 retails for $14.99, and the HP 74XL retails for around $33.99.  If you print more than 50 pages per month, do yourself a favor and stick with the XL cartridges – they have more ink and are more re-fillable.

HP 74XL and HP 74 black ink cartridges compared.  HP 74XL is the way to go over the smaller HP 74 ink cartridge.

Refill kits are available:

Hewlett Packard HP 74, 74XL, XL Ink Cartridge Refills

As you can see from the images, this cartridge is very easy to refill. One negative to refilling is that the ink monitor will no longer function, so it is impossible to tell when the ink is going to run out. This is not a huge deal as the cartridge can be topped off every so often – never let a cartridge run all the way out. If the sponge can get dry, and if ink stops flowing properly the cartridge will not provide an acceptable print.

The HP 74XL cartridge is rated at XXX pages, so that equates to about 18ml of ink. The sponge is not all the way soaked as received from HP, however count on thee cartridge taking at least 18ml of ink. Refill kits are easy to use, and result in $3.00-$4.00 cartridges.

Compatible Cartridges:

HP 74, 74XL compatible ink cartridgesCompatible cartridges are an option for this cartridge. Basically a re-manufactured (compatible) cartridge is just a professionally refilled, or “refilled for you” cartridge. The will run about 30%-40% less than HP brand ink cartridges, and if you can find a quality vendor, contrary to HPs claims the work great.

These re-manufactured cartridges will get cheaper as more become available in the aftermarket. When you buy a new printer, more often than not, it will include new cartridges, and until these cartridges make their way into the 3rd party cartridge re-manufacturers the rice will be high. As the supply of quality empties increases, prices will decrease (in some cases by as much as 70%) and the compatible cartridge becomes a solid choice in the cost per page battle.

The Print Head:

The printhead *will* wear out or get clogged, its just a matter of time. There is no hard data, but the accepted rule is a cartridge can be refilled 3-4 times before it needs to be replaced with a new one. A new “full” cartridge purchase is not always necessary (74XL retails for $34.99. Empties can be had for cheap on eBay, so look there).  Also check Amazon for a good selection of prices.

Unlike Epson, which makes the printhead part of the printer, Hewlett Packard (HP) puts the print head technology on the physical cartridge (for 80% of their consumer printers).  This means every time you buy a new cartridge, it’s like getting a new print head.  This is why these type of HP printers (that use this cartridge style) last forever in our opinion.  As long as the mechanics of the printer keep working it will last forever since the print head can simply be replaced by installing a new cartridge into the printer.

Not all HP printers and cartridges use this style (print head on the cartridge) of build, but a large majority of the ones you will find at Wal-Mart, Target, and other discount retailers use these cartridges.

Notice the 2D UPC code on the print head ribbon. They are actually in three places on the cartridge – the top label, the print head, and on the front facing side (expiration).

HP 74xl black inkjet print cartridge, print head.

Hewlett Packard (HP) 74XL black ink cartridge page estimates:

http://h10060.www1.hp.com/pageyield/en-019/searchResults.html?cCode=us,st=cartridge,ss=CB336W

Hewlett Packard (HP) 74XL black inkjet print cartridge specifications:

http://h10010.www1.hp.com/wwpc/us/en/sm/WF06c/A10-12771-64199-69422-69422-3265895-3266274-3266279.html

This cartridge is compatible with the following HP Deskjet, Officejet, and Photosmart inkjet printers:

Cracked Open: Inside The HP 940 (C4902A) Ink Cartridge

Inside the HP 940 black ink tank cartridge.

Retail price of the HP 940 standard capacity ink cartridge.

Not a good buy - Check the HP 940XL - 3x's the amount of ink.

First off – look at this cartridge all you want, but buy the HP 940XL black – same cartridge, but “full” of ink.

The 940 cartridge from Hewlett  Packard (HP) comes in two different flavors.  The half-full 940 black ink tank, and the “full” HP 940XL black ink tank.  The 940 cartridges contain a very low amount of ink (22ml black – 10ml color) when compared to the 940XL which is completely full and contains a whopping 49ml of ink (16ml XL colors).

The HP 940 (which would include the entire 940 and 940XL series inkjet print cartridges for that matter), cartridge is not refillable (at least *we* do not see how it can be refilled).  There is a foil pouch inside the cartridge that compresses as the ink is used, and there is no obvious way to refill the cartridge.

This cartridge could also be called an ink tank, because that is exactly what it is – an ink holder.  There is no “revolutionary” technology on the cartridge, it simply holds ink.  The 940 series are basically the exact same cartridge design as the HP 88 series.

HP 940 – Black 22ml (1k pages)  $25.99

HP 940XL – Black 49ml (2.2k pages) $35.99*

*Can be had for less.  Much better cost per page rates with the XL cartridge.

Different type of HP cartridge – the ink tank:

HP 940 and HP 60 ink cartridges compared side by side 940 vs 60 print inks

These cartridges contain about the same amount of ink (940 16ml, 60xl 18ml est.)

The HP 940 series cartridges will only work in a select few printers, and consider yourself lucky if you own an HP (Hewlett Packard) Officejet 8000, or 8500.  You will still pay a premium for cartridges, however there are worse printers on the market – watch out on the ink.  As mentioned above, always get the XL black cartridge – a much better value.

The HP 940 is basically an ink tank.  There is no printhead on the cartridge (those are tucked inside the printer and must be replaced at about 10k pages print head).  Recently we have seen a few postings around the web discussing defective print heads – no matter the ink (HP original or compatible cartridges)  – so count on the print heads going out at least once.  They retail for $60.00 each ($120.00 total) so if you see them for less, pick some up.

Since all the hard work is done inside the printer – by the print heads – this cartridge is good at what it does, holding ink. The cartridge is entertaining to see dis-assembled for all of the engineering on the cartridge that is directed at making simple refilling impossible.

Simple Refill – Prevention:

Refill prevention is built into the cartridge with two distinct techniques.  One, a non resettable chip prevents “simple” re-use of the cartridge.  Currently there are no (none, zero, nada) HP 940 chip resetters on the market, so the chip cannot be reset.  Use of an “expired” chip in the printer is ok, and the cartridge will still function in the printer, however the ink levels will always be shown as empty.

Bottom side of the HP 940, 940XL, XL inkjet print cartridge - ink tank.

The chip can be moved to a full cartridge

Not easy – you need an xact-o knife, or something very sharp.  Do *not* mess around with a screwdriver as it will damage the chip.  If the chip becomes damaged it will no longer be recognized by the printer, and thus useless.  The chip on the HP 940 series looks identical to that of the HP 564 series we looked at here.

HP 940 back ink cartridge close-up of chip to be removed for use on chipless compatible

Chip is in there very tight. Use sharp and thin tool to remove.

Removing the bottom cover on the HP 940 Officejet Pro 8000, 8500 ink cartridge.

Removing the plastic cover from the bottom of the cartridge is easy enough – just cut the label where it covers the obvious seams – grasp with a firm hand, and it pops right off.  The internals of the cartridge can be removed (none of this helps to be able to refill the cartridge) – press the two tabs in, and the cartridge assembly slides right out.

HP 940 series black ink cartridge internal structure.  Internal parts on the HP 940 un-refillable ink cartridge.

HP 940 series black ink cartridge internal structure. Internal parts on the HP 940 un-refillable ink cartridge. Tabs.

Removing the cartridge assembly:

Internal ink container for the HP 940 series black inkjet print cartridge from Hewlett Packard.

All that is left is an empty shell.

Once the ink assembly has been removed, all that is left is the empty carcass of the HP 940 black ink cartridge.

HP 940 black ink cartridge empty shell.

HP 940 black ink cartridge empty shell.

Inside the HP 940 ink cartridge.

This cartridge is empty, all the ink has been sucked out of the internal pouch. the cartridge looks pressurized as the plastic covering has collapsed around the empty pouch.  The Black HP 940 cartridge contains 16ml of ink.  In contrast, the HP 940XL cartridge (same size and shape as this cartridge) contains 49ml of ink.

The cartridge could possibly be re-filled through the black ink exit hole (self sealing) with a needle and syringe, however not sure of the gauge required, and it would (maybe) be easy to puncture the internal bladder.

HP 940 black ink cartridge internal structure of the cartridge - can this 940 black ink cartridge be refilled?

HP 940 black ink cartridge internal structure of the cartridge - can this 940 black ink cartridge be refilled?

Cartridge not (easily) refillable…

We guess you could stick a refill needle where the ink exits the cartridge – self sealing access.

Inside the foil package there is a black pouch.  The foil like plastic is stuck to the black pouch with a very sticky backing.  It was very hard to get the two layers apart. Not really necessary to do this, however it is interesting to see that the pouch is “double sealed.”

HP 940 black ink cartridge internal structure foil pouch covers internal black pouch.

Cartridge Specifications (HP.com):

http://h10010.www1.hp.com/wwpc/us/en/sm/WF06c/A10-12771-64199-69422-69422-3777779-3777780-3777786.html

Page yield information about this cartridge series:

http://h10060.www1.hp.com/pageyield/en-019/yields/OJP8000A809_page.html?cCode=us

Since the 940XL black cartridge is a better choice click here to, compare prices on the HP 940XL ink cartridges.

Review: Inside (Cracked Open) The HP 901 (CC653A) Black Inkjet Print Cartridge

The internal structure of the HP 901 (CC653AN) black inkjet print cartridge.

Retail price on this cartridge is $14.99.  If you can afford it, check out the HP 901XL (901 XL) black “full” cartridge.  The HP 901 cartridge has the same basic structure as the HP 60 (which is also designed to be half empty) – the cartridge is designed to be over half empty – note the presence of a reduced sized internal chamber for the sponge which makes this cartridge not practical for refilling.  Why pay to refill a “designed to be half-empty” cartridge.

Lots of empty space in the HP 901 black cartridge:

hp 901 ink cartridge empty space.

Places you will find no ink. Cannot be refilled area.

Not a good cartridge for refilling or re-manufacturing:

The HP 901 ink cartridge – designed from the beginning to be half-empty, and cannot be refilled to maximum capacity.  The sponge (white space) is sealed off from the rest of the cartridge.  The bottom of the cartridge where the print head is located is hollow.  This cheap ($14.99) cartridge is two things – hard to maintain refilled as the cartridge only lasts for an HP estimated 200 pages.  Pathetic. The second issue is the principal of the thing; don’t block-off parts of the cartridge to discourage refillers, and don’t lead the consumer to believe that they are getting a “full” cartridge when purchased.  Did you think your HP 901 black ink cartridge was full? Well think again!

HP hewlett packard 901 black inkjet print cartridge designed to be half empty.

The HP 901 black cartridge is designed to be over half empty.

The Price Is Cheap?

Think Hewlett Packard (HP) did this on accident?  This would make paying $10-$15 to refill this cartridge a complete waste of cash (since the retail price is $14.99 for the HP 901 black ink.  If you must use this cartridge series, look to the HP 901XL black inkjet print cartridge which results in a much cheaper cost per printed page.  Remember the HP 901XL black has about 2.5 times the amount of ink as the standard 901 black.

HP 901 black inkjet print cartridge - retail price from HP's website.

HP 901 black inkjet print cartridge - retail price from HP's website.

An insult to consumers.

When you purchase the above ink cartridge is it reasonable to think that the cartridge does not have “refilling” defeating measures (very small sponge).  The price is cheap, but alas, you get what you pay for.  Part of HPs new ink cartridge strategy – “you can pay us now, or you can pay us now.”

HP 901 cartridge highlights:

Uses durable pigment based inks.  Pigment inks will clog inkjet printers – a fact of life – so basically replacing the print head with every cartridge is a good application.  Pigment inks are noted for their longevity, and resistance to smearing, however they will eventually hopelessly clog the print head.  Since the print head is on the cartridge, the “heads” are replaced every time you replace the cartridge with a new one.

HP 901 black inkjet printer cartridge opened and exposed to reveal the internal structure of the ink cartridge

Specifications:

Color: Black
Part Number: CC653AN – HP 901 Black
Ink Type: Pigment based ink
HP 901 Ink Volume: 3-5ml
Page Yield: 200 pages*

Ink Drop Size: 15pl

Retail price: $14.99
Street price: $13.18

* that 200 page estimate is from HP and based on 5% coverage (see what 5% coverage really looks like) – needless to say, manufacturer estimates are always on the “high side.”

This cartridge is often paired with the HP 901 tri-color ink cartridge which we cracked open here.  Note while there is an HP 901XL (full) black cartridge available – there is no “full” color cartridge (901 XL tri-color does not exist), only the HP 901 tri-color cartridge is available.

For Refillers:

Refilling is easy if you know where to put the refilling needle.  There are five (5) holes already in the cartridge lid which are covered up by the cartridge number sticker.  As you can see from the other images, there is black ink around only one (1) of the holes. We suggest using the middle hole since it is the only one that goes directly into the sponge.  All the other holes are there to confuse refillers. Refill kits can be a hassle, but are worth it if you are on a tight budget and have a cartridge that will only take 3-5ml of ink.

Where to refill the HP 901 black inkjet print cartridge -  top three holes are where to refill the HP 901 black ink cartridge

Hewlett Packard HP 901, 901XL, XL Ink Cartridge Refills
Refill kits are available:

This cartridge is not the greatest candidate for refilling – it has a small sponge,  and unless you know where to fill ink can go where there is no sponge. One negative to refilling is that the ink monitor will no longer function, so it is impossible to tell when the ink is going to run out. Never let a cartridge, you hope to refill, run all the way out of ink. If the sponge gets dry, and if ink stops flowing properly the cartridge will not provide an acceptable print after refilling.

The HP 901 cartridge is rated at 200 (we have experienced 100 pages or less) pages, so that equates to about 5ml of ink. The sponge is not all the way soaked as received from HP, however count on the 901 black cartridge taking at least 5ml of ink. Refill kits are easy to use, and result in $3.00-$4.00 cartridges.  If you are serious about refilling, the HP 901XL black inkjet print cartridge is a much better choice as it has a complete sponge.

Compatible Cartridges:

HP 74, 74XL compatible ink cartridgesCompatible cartridges are an option for this cartridge. Basically a re-manufactured (compatible) cartridge is just a professionally refilled, or “refilled for you” cartridge. The will run about 30%-40% less than HP brand ink cartridges, and if you can find a quality vendor, contrary to HPs claims the work great.

These re-manufactured cartridges will get cheaper as more become available in the aftermarket. When you buy a new printer, more often than not, it will include new cartridges, and until these cartridges make their way into the 3rd party cartridge re-manufacturers the price will be high. As the supply of quality empties increases, prices will decrease (in some cases by as much as 70%) and the compatible cartridge becomes a solid choice in the cost per page battle.

Contact! – Contact!

These solder points, or contacts help make up the print head.  Printers that use these types of cartridges do not have an internal print head – rather the print head is located on the cartridges themselves.  If print quality declines to the point where the cartridge is no longer usable, simply try another cartridge (it’s like getting a new printer).  If your cartridge cannot be recognized, give the contacts a quick clean with a damp cloth, or other device and try again.  If the contacts are harmed, the cartridge may not function at all.

Solder points - contact points for the HP 901 black inkjet printer cartridge

Notice more designed empty space.

The Print Head:

Unlike Epson, which makes the printhead part of the printer, Hewlett Packard (HP) puts the print head technology on the cartridge (for most of their consumer printers).  This means every time you buy a new cartridge, it’s like getting a new printer.  This is why these type of HP printers (that use this cartridge style) last forever in our opinion.  As long as the mechanics of the printer keep working it will last forever since the print head can simply be replaced by installing a new cartridge into the printer.

Not all HP printers and cartridges use this style (print head on the cartridge) of build, but a large majority of the ones you will find at Wal-Mart, Target, Best Buy, and other discount (online) retailers use these cartridges.

Notice the 2D UPC code on the print head ribbon.

HP 901 black inkjet print cartridge empty and opened up to expose internal structure of ink cartridge

Is this an embedded expiration date?

Yet another 2D UPC code on the outside front of the cartridge.  So that is 3 total on a single cartridge.  If (HP) Hewlett Packard went to the trouble of putting them on there, you can bet they are there for a reason.  HP claims there is no built-in “self-destruct” expiration date for their cartridges.  Read more about it here…

http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?docname=c01764161&cc=us&dlc=en&lc=en

HP 901 black inkjet printer cartridge for HP printers

Compatible With:

HP 901 black (cc653A) specifications and warranty info:

http://h10010.www1.hp.com/wwpc/us/en/sm/WF06c/A10-12771-64199-69422-69422-3565316-3565318-3565482.html

HP 901 black (CC653A) page yield info:

http://h10060.www1.hp.com/pageyield/en-019/searchResults.html?cCode=us,st=cartridge,ss=CC653A

There is really no reason to ever buy this cartridge.  A quick check of Amazon reveals that the 901 XL cartridge (700 pages) will run you $27.99, or about twice what the HP 901 half full cartridge (200 pages) will cost you.  Ultimately, the best advice is to avoid this cartridge (and the printers that work with it) completely.

Review: Inside The HP 95 Tri-Color (Color) Inkjet Print Cartridge (C8766W) – Cracked Open

Inside the HP 95 Tri-Color (Color) Ink Cartridge:

Retail price on this cartridge is $28.99, but can be had for less.  Not a terrible cartridge, however the HP 97 is a better value if you can use it.  If you print more than 100-200 pages per month, consider a different printer and avoid these types of cartridges altogether.

Retail price for HP color ink cartridge 95 from the HP website.

Retail price for HP color ink cartridge 95 from the HP website.

A look inside the cartridge…

Exploded view – holes are present, no drilling necessary for refilling. Yellow on the top, magenta (red) on the left, and cyan (blue) on the right side.

Hewlett Packard Inkjet print cartridge HP 95 exploded view

Not a terrible cartridge for the occasional printer, but this one is “half-as-full” as the HP 97 tri-color (color) inkjet print cartridge.  If your printer can use the HP 97 (common with some printers that can also use the HP 95) it contains twice the ink and is only $11.00-$5.00 more (retail) – cheaper via online, or local stores.

Hewlett Packard (HP) 95 color ink cartridge with cover removed to reveal the internal structure of the ink cartridge.

Hewlett Packard (HP) 95 color ink cartridge with cover removed to reveal the internal structure of the ink cartridge.

Specifications:

Color: Tri-Color (Color)
Part Number: (C8766W), HP 95
Ink Type: Dye based color ink
Ink volume: 7ml (compare with HP 97 at 14ml)
Page Yield: 260 pages – or 90 photos (a different HP estimate of 330 pages)

Ink Drop Size: 5pl

Retail price: $28.99
Street price: $24.99

* that 260 page estimate is (impressive) from HP and based on 5% coverage (see what 5% coverage really looks like) – needless to say, manufacturer estimates are on the “high side.”

This cartridge is often paired with the HP 96 black inkjet print cartridge (which we cracked open here), or the (smaller) HP 94 black inkjet print cartridge, or the (even smaller ink volume) HP 92 black ink cartridge.

For Refillers:

Refilling is easy if you know where to fill.  There are five (5) holes in the cartridge lid.  As you can see from the other images, there are three (3) different chambers, one for each color. Also, keep in mind that the holes are already there on this cartridge, no need for drilling. Refill kits can be a hassle, but are worth it if you are on a tight budget.  This cartridge is very easy to refill, just need a syringe and some ink.

Hewlett Packard (HP 95) 95 color ink cartridge refill hole locations.

How the colors are laid out in the HP 95 color ink cartridge.

Contact! – Contact!

These solder points, or contacts help make up the print head.  Printers that use these types of cartridges do not have an internal print head – rather the print head is located on the cartridges themselves.  If print quality declines to the point where the cartridge is no longer usable, simply try another cartridge (it’s like getting a new printer).  If your cartridge cannot be recognized, give the contacts a quick clean with a damp cloth, or other device and try again.  If the contacts are harmed, the cartridge may not function at all.

Hewlett Packard (HP) 95 color inkjet print cartridge contacts.

Hewlett Packard (HP) 95 color inkjet print cartridge contacts.

The Print Head:

Unlike Epson, which makes the printhead part of the printer, Hewlett Packard (HP) puts the print head technology on the cartridge (for most of their consumer printers).  This means every time you buy a new cartridge, it’s like getting a new printer.  This is why these type of HP printers (that use this cartridge style) last forever in our opinion.  As long as the mechanics of the printer keep working it will last forever since the print head can simply be replaced by installing a new cartridge into the printer.

Not all HP printers and cartridges use this style (print head on the cartridge) of build, but a large majority of the ones you will find at Wal-Mart, Target, and other discount (online) retailers use these cartridges.

Notice the 2D UPC code on the print head ribbon.

Hewlett Packard (HP) inkjet printer cartridge print head HP 95 color ink cartridge.

If the printhead becomes dirty or damaged, the cartridge will simply not function. Purchasing a new cartridge is the only option at that point.

Is this an embedded expiration date?

Yet another 2D UPC code on the outside front of the cartridge.  So that is 3 total on a single cartridge.  If (HP) Hewlett Packard went to the trouble of putting them on there, you can bet they are there for a reason.  HP claims there is no built-in “self-destruct” expiration date for their cartridges.  Read more about it here…

http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?docname=c01764161&cc=us&dlc=en&lc=en

HP 95 color inkjet print cartridge expiration date

HP 95 color inkjet print cartridge expiration date?

Compatible with:

This cartridge works in a bunch of printers.

Specifications for the HP 95 color inkjet print cartridge here:

http://h10010.www1.hp.com/wwpc/us/en/sm/WF06c/A10-12771-64199-69422-69422-397377-397379-397383.html

Information about page yields here:

http://h10060.www1.hp.com/pageyield/en-019/searchResults.html?cCode=us,st=cartridge,ss=C8766W

Compare prices here.

Review: Inside The HP 97 Tri-Color (Color) Inkjet Print Cartridge (C9363W) – Cracked Open

Inside the HP 97 Tri-Color (Color) Ink Cartridge:

Retail price for the HP 97 tri-color ink cartridge.

Retail price (HP.com) for the HP 97 tri-color (color) ink cartridge.

A good cartridge from HP, but alas, it only works in a very few printers.  Another illustration why it is important to know the cartridge, before you get to fond of a particular printer.  The HP 97 is a good value cartridge – it contains a good amount of ink, is easily refilled, and compatibles are readily available.  Look for printers that use this cartridge to avoid getting ripped off on cost per page.

Hewlett Packard (HP) inkjet print cartridge HP 97 tri-color, color, opened up to expose internal structure

Internal structure of the HP 97 ink cartridge.

Specifications:

Color: Tri-Color (Color)
Part Number: (C9363W), HP 97
Ink Type: Dye based color ink
Ink Volume: 14ml
Page Yield: 460 pages – or 160 photos (a different HP estimate of 560 pages)

Ink Drop Size: 5pl

Retail price: $39.99
Street price: $33.99

* that 460 page estimate is (impressive) from HP and based on 5% coverage (see what 5% coverage really looks like) – needless to say, manufacturer estimates are on the “high side.”

This is probably the best “value” color cartridge (of this type) HP has to offer.  Current printers do not take advantage of this cartridge.

This cartridge is often paired with the HP 96 black inkjet print cartridge (which we cracked open here), or the (smaller) HP 94 black inkjet print cartridge.

Hewlett packard (HP) 97 color ink cartridge for the HP photosmart and deskjet inkjet print cartridge

Notice how the sponges are saturated to the top. This means they are "full" of ink.

For Refillers:

Refilling is easy if you know where to fill.  There are five (5) holes in the cartridge lid.  As you can see from the other images, there are three (3) different chambers, one for each color. Also, keep in mind that the holes are already there on this cartridge, no need for drilling. Refill kits can be a hassle, but are worth it if you are on a tight budget.  This cartridge is very easy to refill.

Refill hole locations for the HP 97 ink cartridge

Refill hole locations for the HP 97 ink cartridge. Holes are there, no need to drill.

Contact! – Contact!

These solder points, or contacts help make up the print head.  Printers that use these types of cartridges do not have an internal print head – rather the print head is located on the cartridges themselves.  If print quality declines to the point where the cartridge is no longer usable, simply try another cartridge (it’s like getting a new printer).  If your cartridge cannot be recognized, give the contacts a quick clean with a damp cloth, or other device and try again.  If the contacts are harmed, the cartridge may not function at all.

Hewlett Packard (HP) 97 inkjet print cartridge print head contacts

Cartridge can become un-usable if contacts are damaged.

The Print Head:

Unlike Epson, which makes the printhead part of the printer, Hewlett Packard (HP) puts the print head technology on the cartridge (for most of their consumer printers).  This means every time you buy a new cartridge, it’s like getting a new printer.  This is why these type of HP printers (that use this cartridge style) last forever in our opinion.  As long as the mechanics of the printer keep working it will last forever since the print head can simply be replaced by installing a new cartridge into the printer.

Not all HP printers and cartridges use this style (print head on the cartridge) of build, but a large majority of the ones you will find at Wal-Mart, Target, and other discount (online) retailers use these cartridges.

Notice the 2D UPC code on the print head ribbon.

Hewlett Packard (HP) 97 ink cartridge print head.

This HP 97 ink cartridge can become un-useable if the print head is damaged or becomes clogged.

Is this an embedded expiration date?

Yet another 2D UPC code on the outside front of the cartridge.  So that is 3 total on a single cartridge.  If (HP) Hewlett Packard went to the trouble of putting them on there, you can bet they are there for a reason.  HP claims there is no built-in “self-destruct” expiration date for their cartridges.  Read more about it here…

http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?docname=c01764161&cc=us&dlc=en&lc=en

Hewlett packard (HP) 97 ink cartridge expiration date silkscreened on the cartridge itself.

HP 97 ink cartridge expiration date. On the actual cartridge itself.

Compatible with:

Specifications for the HP 97 inkjet print cartridge here:

http://h10010.www1.hp.com/wwpc/us/en/sm/WF06c/A10-12771-64199-69422-69422-397427-397429-397433.html

Information about page yields here:

http://h10060.www1.hp.com/pageyield/en-019/searchResults.html?cCode=us,st=cartridge,ss=97

Overall this is a decent cartridge choice.  As mentioned earlier, it contains a good amount of ink, is easily refilled, and compatibles are readily available.  Look for printers that use this cartridge to avoid getting ripped off on cost per page.  If your printer can use this cartridge, you should buy it.

Compare prices here.

Review: Inside The CC641WN HP 60 XL – 60XL Black Ink Cartridge (Cracked Open)

The HP 60XL Black Ink Cartridge – A “Full” Cartridge.

There are two (2) versions of the HP 60 black inkjet print cartridge.  The only difference in the two is the amount of ink they each contain, that is it  – the HP 60 black is rated at 200 pages, and the The HP 60XL is rated at 600 pages.  But which one is a better value?  Depends on how much you print. Take a look inside the HP 60, look here.

HP 60XL black retail price.

Contains hefty amount of ink:

The HP 60XL black inkjet print cartridge boasts a whopping 600 printed pages estimate.  These estimates are almost always overly exaggerated.  This cartridge is also easily refilled with kits from $12.99, or compatibles (professionally refilled) can be purchased around $20-$25.  The HP original cartridge (with pigment ink) will run around $35.00 plus.  A good cartridge, and owners of printers that can use it – should.

HP 60XL, 60 XL ink cartridge opened to expose the internal structure - removal of cartridge cap - remove top of ink cartridge.

Removing the top of the HP 60XL ink cartridge reveals the inside of the cartridge. No refill deterrent ink chambers here, this is a "full" cartridge with a complete sponge.

Specifications:

Color: Black
Part Number: (CC641WN) – HP 60XL
Ink Type: Pigment based ink
Page Yield: 600 pages*

Ink Drop Size: 13.8pl

Retail price: $34.99
Street price: $29.99

* that 600 page estimate is from HP and based on 5% coverage (see what 5% coverage really looks like) – needless to say, manufacturer estimates are on the “high side.”

This cartridge is often paired with the HP 60, and 60XL tri-color inkjet print (color) cartridge which we cracked open here.

HP 60XL, 60 XL ink cartridge opened to expose the internal structure - removal of cartridge cap - remove top of ink cartridge.

The sponge fills the entire HP 60XL, 60 XL ink cartridge.

Cartridge Contacts

These solder points, or contacts help make up the print head.  Printers that use these types of cartridges do not have an internal print head – rather the print head is located on the cartridges themselves.  If print quality declines to the point where the cartridge is no longer usable, simply try another cartridge (it’s like getting a new printer).  If your cartridge cannot be recognized, give the contacts a quick clean with a damp cloth, or other device and try again.  If the contacts are harmed, the cartridge may not function at all.

HP 60XL, 60 XL ink cartridge opened to expose the internal structure - removal of cartridge cap - remove top of ink cartridge.

Contacts on the cartridge - the print head is on the physical cartridge in this design.

The Print Head:

Unlike Epson, which makes the printhead part of the printer, Hewlett Packard (HP) puts the print head technology on the physical cartridge (for 80% of their consumer printers).  This means every time you buy a new cartridge, it’s like getting a new print head.  This is why these type of HP printers (that use this cartridge style) last forever in our opinion.  As long as the mechanics of the printer keep working it will last forever since the print head can simply be repalced by installing a new cartridge into the printer.  Not all HP printers and cartridges use this style (print head on the cartridge) of build, but a large majority of the ones you will find at Wal-Mart, Target, and other discount retailers use these cartridges.

Notice the 2D UPC code on the print head ribbon. They are actually in three places on the cartridge – the top label, the print head, and on the front facing side (expiration).

HP 60XL, 60 XL ink cartridge opened to expose the internal structure - removal of cartridge cap - remove top of ink cartridge.

Printhead of the HP 60XL, 60 XL ink cartridge.

For Refillers:

Refilling is easy if you know where to fill.  There are five (5) holes in the cartridge lid.  As you can see from the other images, there is black ink around all five (5) of the holes. We suggest using the top most hole since it is closer to where the ink will exit the cartridge. Refill kits can be a hassle, but are worth it if you are on a tight budget and have patience.  There is no need to drill into this cartridge to refill – the holes are already there.

No need to drill any holes in the HP 60, 60XL, XL ink cartridge - they are already there.

No need to drill any holes, they are already there.

HP 60XL, 60 XL ink cartridge opened to expose the internal structure - removal of cartridge cap - remove top of ink cartridge.

Refill this cartridge in any of the five (5) holes under the identification sticker.

Is this an embedded expiration date?

Yet another 2D UPC code on the outside front of the cartridge.  So that is 3 total on a single cartridge.  If (HP) Hewlett Packard went to the trouble of putting them on there, you can bet they are there for a reason.  HP claims there is no built-in “self-destruct” expiration date for their cartridges.  Read more about it here…

http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?docname=c01764161&cc=us&dlc=en&lc=en

Expiration date on the HP 60XL black inkjet print cartridge?

Expiration date on the HP 60XL black inkjet print cartridge?

HP 60 And HP 60XL Compared:

There really is no comparison.  The HP 60 cartridge (on the left), or the “value” cartridge as HP refers to it has two things wrong with it.  First, the sponge is one-sixth the size as the 60XL, and it is contained in a plastic divide to deter refillers.  Second, you can refill it, but look at what little ink the mini-sponge will take.  The HP 60 cartridge will require constant attention to maintain it’s “full” status.

The HP 60 retails for $14.99, and the HP 60XL retails for around $33.99.  If you print more than 50 pages per month, do yourself a favor and stick with the XL cartridges – they have more ink and are more re-fillable.

HP 60XL, 60 XL ink cartridge opened to expose the internal structure - removal of cartridge cap - remove top of ink cartridge.

The HP 60 cartridge on the left is no value, that is for sure. The sponge is one-sixth the size as the larger HP 60XL inkjet print cartridge.

Hewlett Packard HP 60 (60XL) Series Ink Cartridges Work In The Following HP Inkjet Printers
Deskjet Series Photosmart Series
DeskJet D1660

Deskjet D2500

Deskjet D2530

Deskjet D2560

Deskjet D2660

Deskjet F42

Deskjet F4200

Deskjet F4210

Deskjet F4230

Deskjet F4235

Deskjet F4240

Deskjet F4250

Deskjet F4272

Deskjet F4273

Deskjet F4274

Deskjet F4275

Deskjet F4280

DeskJet F4283

Deskjet F4288

Deskjet F4292

Deskjet F4293

DeskJet F4480

PhotoSmart C4640

PhotoSmart C4650

PhotoSmart C4680

PhotoSmart C4740

PhotoSmart C4750

PhotoSmart C4780

PhotoSmart C4795

Hewlett Packard (HP) 60XL ink cartridge page estimates:

http://h10060.www1.hp.com/pageyield/en-019/searchResults.html?cCode=us,st=cartridge,ss=60

Hewlett Packard (HP) 60XL ink cartridge specifications:

http://h10010.www1.hp.com/wwpc/us/en/sm/WF06c/A10-12771-64199-69422-69422-3564563-3564739-3564756.html

Hewlett Packard HP 60XL Inkjet Print Cartridge Pricing:

HP 60, 60XL, XL ink cartridges.

Review: Inside The HP 96 Black Inkjet Print Cartridge (C8767W) – Cracked Open

Inside the HP 96 ink cartridge – hint, it’s really full.

An old cartridge, but excellent value.

hp 96 retail price

A good cartridge from HP, but alas, it only works in a very few printers.  Another illustration why it is important to know the cartridge, before you get to fond of a particular printer.  The HP 96 is a winner in the cost per page war.

It is actually larger:

The size of the HP 96 is unusual, and will only work with a few HP printers.  This cartridge was never really marketed as a “high yield”, “XL”, or “value” inkjet print cartridge.  It is just big, and is optional with most of the printers it works with (HP 94, or HP 98 black carts are *usually* included with printers).

The HP 96 black ink cartridge is much bigger (physically) that most all the other black cartridges of this type.

The HP 96 black ink cartridge is much bigger (physically) that most all the other black cartridges of this type.

Removal Of Top Of Cartridge

We managed to get this top off with a screwdriver (normally, and usually it takes a dremel).  There was much prying, and it took some real force, but we managed to get it off in one piece.  It will not go back on the cartridge without glue, and that may not be enough to hold, so this cartridge is no longer usable.

HP 96 cartridge highlights:

Uses durable pigment based inks.  Hewlett Packard (HP) gets credit here for this cartridge.  Pigment inks will clog inkjet printers – a fact of life – so basically replacing the print head with every cartridge is a good application.  Pigment inks are noted for their longevity, and resistance to smearing, however they will eventually hopelessly clog the print head.  Since the print head is on the cartridge, the “heads” are replaced every time you replace the cartridge with a new one.

Remove he top of the ink cartridge HP 96 black ink - full cartridge.

The HP 96 black ink cartridge is all sponge. An economical "full" cartridge is rare to see. An oversized full cartridge is even rarer to see.

Contains hefty amount of ink:

The HP 96 black inkjet print cartridge also boasts a whopping 860 page estimate.  These estimates are almost always overly exaggerated, however this is a very high number for an ink cartridge (the HP 60XL is rated at 600 pages – remember, it is physically smaller).  This cartridge is also easily refilled with kits from $12.99, or compatibles (professionally refilled) can be purchased cheaply, around $10-$15.00.  The HP original cartridge (with pigment ink) will run around $35.00 plus.  A good cartridge, and owners of printers that can use it – should.

Sponge removed from HP 96 high capacity black ink cartridge.

The sponge in the HP 96 (870 pgs) ink cartridge is much larger than the sponge in the HP 60XL (600 pgs), or HP 95 (330 pgs) ink cartridges.

Specifications:

Color: Black
Part Number: (C8767W), HP 96
Ink Type: Pigment based ink
HP 97 Ink Volume: 21ml
Page Yield: 870 pages*

Ink Drop Size: 15pl

Retail price: $33.99
Street price: $33.99

* that 860 page estimate is (impressive) from HP and based on 5% coverage (see what 5% coverage really looks like) – needless to say, manufacturer estimates are on the “high side.”

This is probably the best “value” cartridge HP has to offer.  Current printers do not take advantage of this cartridge.

This cartridge is often paired with the HP 97 tri-color inkjet print (color) cartridge which we cracked open here.

Comparison of the HP 96 and HP 60XL black ink cartridge sponges.

Comparison of the HP 96 (870 pgs) and HP 60XL (600 pgs) black ink cartridge sponges.

For Refillers:

Refilling is easy if you know where to drill.  There are seven (7) holes in the cartridge lid.  As you can see from the other images, there is black ink around only five (5) of the holes. We suggest using the top most hole since it is closer to where the ink will exit the cartridge. Refill kits can be a hassle, but are worth it if you are on a tight budget.

refill hole locations for the HP 96 black inkjet printer cartridge from HP Hewlett Packard

There are seven (7) holes on the HP 96 black ink cartridge. We suggest using the top hole if refilling.

Contact! – Contact!

These solder points, or contacts help make up the print head.  Printers that use these types of cartridges do not have an internal print head – rather the print head is located on the cartridges themselves.  If print quality declines to the point where the cartridge is no longer usable, simply try another cartridge (it’s like getting a new printer).  If your cartridge cannot be recognized, give the contacts a quick clean with a damp cloth, or other device and try again.  If the contacts are harmed, the cartridge may not function at all.

Print head contacts on the HP 96 black ink cartridge.

If these contacts become damaged, and cease functioning the cartridge is useless. If refilling, be careful not to hurt these delicate electronics.

The Print Head:

Unlike Epson, which makes the printhead part of the printer, Hewlett Packard (HP) puts the print head technology on the cartridge (for most of their consumer printers).  This means every time you buy a new cartridge, it’s like getting a new printer.  This is why these type of HP printers (that use this cartridge style) last forever in our opinion.  As long as the mechanics of the printer keep working it will last forever since the print head can simply be replaced by installing a new cartridge into the printer.

Not all HP printers and cartridges use this style (print head on the cartridge) of build, but a large majority of the ones you will find at Wal-Mart, Target, and other discount (online) retailers use these cartridges.

Notice the 2D UPC code on the print head ribbon.

Print head printhead for the HP 96 black ink cartridge

The print head is on the cartridge, not inside the printer.

Is this an embedded expiration date?

Yet another 2D UPC code on the outside front of the cartridge.  So that is 3 total on a single cartridge.  If (HP) Hewlett Packard went to the trouble of putting them on there, you can bet they are there for a reason.  HP claims there is no built-in “self-destruct” expiration date for their cartridges.  Read more about it here…

http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?docname=c01764161&cc=us&dlc=en&lc=en

HP cartridge has an expiration date - after this date the printer will no longer accept the cartridge.

HP cartridge has an expiration date - after this date the printer will no longer accept the cartridge.

Compatible With:

This cartridge (HP 96) will work in the following Deskjet and Photosmart Hewlett Packard (HP) inkjet printers.

Specifications for the HP 96 ink cartridge here:

http://h10010.www1.hp.com/wwpc/us/en/sm/WF06c/A10-12771-64199-69422-69422-397402-397404-397408.html

Overall this is the top of the line for HP.  The “most full” cartridge of this type.  Again, if your printer will accept it, you should buy it.  This cartridge is great even for the occasional printer.  You wont get ripped off, and the thing is air tight, so evaporation should be minimal.

Compare prices here.