Cartridges: “New” Epson Ink Cartridge T125 Series

New Epson Ink Cartridge  – T125

Epson stylus ink cartridge T125120, T125220, T125320, T125420 ink cartridgesNew printers from Epson come with a secret feature – a new cartridge (T125 series ink cartridges).  There are four (4) flavors of these cartridges (t125) for Epson’s low-end 4-color all-in-ones like the:

The T125 series cartridges come in 4 flavors, black, cyan (blue), magenta (red), and yellow.

T125 series ink cartridges from Epson - Four (4) in the series.

Cartridges use durabrite pigment based ink resulting in durable inkjet prints.  These printers are fine, but they are identical in function to the previous generation (NX400, NX100, NX110, Workforce 500) of Epson printers, with the exception of wireless printing which is standard on the NX420, and Workforce 520 printers.  If wireless printing is not a big deal for you, then look at some of the other Epson offerings like the NX400, and Workforce 500. The older the printer, the more 3rd party printing choices there are out there.  New printers are impossible to work with – look for coupons and deals.

Pricing and part numbers from the Epson Website.

Epson pricing for the T125, T125120, T125220, T125320, T125420, inkjet print cartridges for the NX420 and others.

New cartridge = New chip.

A new cartridge means (2) two things for those looking for a compatible (cheaper) cartridge – a new chip, and new plastic cartridge molds. It also means that ink cartridges will be hard to find in the first 30-60 days (Epson) of release, and generic cartridges will arrive somewhere in the next 180 days (not available currently).  Epson is employing a two chip configuration on all their cartridges, so the T125 series are almost impossible to refill, and even harder to make “re-manufactured.” Compatible cartridges cannot be imported to the USA (thanks to a legal victory by Epson several years ago), so you will not be seeing compatible or generic cartridges at your local Staples, Office Depot, Target or Walmart.  Look online, and look in about 30-60 days.  If you need cartridges immediately, stay away from the T124 cartridges.

Theses cartridges are identical to their predecessors, but with a new chip, and new plastics to deal with, count on getting ripped off with Epson brand inks for the foreseeable future.

Printers that use the T125 series ink cartridge:

Epson Stylus NX125 inkjet printer.

NX125

Epson Stylus NX127 inkjet printer.

NX127

Epson Stylus NX420 inkjet printer.

NX420

Epson Workforce 520 inkjet printer.

WF 520

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News: “New” Printers From Canon, Pixma MG5220, MP495, MG5120, MP280, iP4820

Canon Announces “New” Inkjet Printers.

New and improved inkjet printers from Canon?  Not really - welcome to new-old cartridges.Canon has introduced a new set of Pixma Inkjet printers. The Canon Pixma MG5220, Pixma MP495, Pixma MG5120, Pixma MP280, and the Canon Pixma iP4820.  Rest easy, no “new” major printing technology has been developed in the past several years, so these printers represent nothing more than “new” model numbers.  Oh, and new ink cartridges too (cli-226, and pgi-225)*.  There are two wireless printers in this bunch, the MG5220, and the MP495 – we currently have a love/hate relationship with wireless printing.

CLI-221 chip cartridge chips.  All Canon cartridges include a page count and ientifier chip on the end of the cartridgeNew designs, new cartridges…

These five (5) printers (MG5220, MP495, MG5120, MP280, iP4820) have some new plastics and design changes, but they are functionally the same as their predecessors.  There is some software included with these printers to let users print single frames of HQ video, and pictures can be downloaded and printed from Flickr (we could already do that right?).  Nothing major here, just an excuse to introduce a new cartridge series (PGI-225, and CLI-226 series cartridges), and to expand on the existing market for their “HP like” PG-210, and CL-211 inks cartridge series.

“Meet The New Canons”

Canon PIXMA MG5220 *Wireless* AIO (All-In-One) Inkjet Printer:

Canon mg5220 inkjet printer - Canon pixma mg5220 inkjet print cartridges.

Canon Pixma MG 5220 printer. Wireless.

Suprise! These printers use a new cartridge from Canon, the PGI-225 pigment black (larger black cartridge), and the CLI-226 color ink cartridges (including individual photo black, cyan, magenta, and yellow cartridges).  These printers use 5 individual ink cartridges total.

Ink Tanks Used: PGI-225 Pigment Black CLI-226 (Cyan/Magenta/Yellow/Black)

We expect these cartridges to look exactly like the current CLI-221 ink, and PGI-220 ink cartridges.  You can bet the chips on the end of the cartridge are different. Wireless printing is a nice feature in a home or small office with wireless laptops or other devices.

Canon PIXMA MG5120 AIO (All-In-One) Inkjet Printer:

Canon MG5120 inkjet printer from Canon - uses the PGI-225, and CLI-226 inkjet printer cartridges.

Canon Pixma MG5120 Inkjet Printer

Suprise! These printers use a new cartridge from Canon, the PGI-225 pigment black (larger black cartridge), and the CLI-226 color cartridges (including individual photo black, cyan, magenta, and yellow cartridges).  These printers use 5 individual ink cartridges total. These “new” cartridges are the same physical size and shape as the previous cartridges used in this printer series [iP4200, iP4300, iP4500, iP4600, iP4700] the CLI-221, PGI-220] however now there are new chips to deal with, and your old cartridges will not work in this “new” printer.

Ink Tanks Used: PGI-225 Pigment Black CLI-226 (Cyan/Magenta/Yellow/Black)

We expect these cartridges to look exactly like the current CLI-221, and PGI-220 cartridges.  You can bet the chips on the end of the cartridge are different.

Canon PIXMA iP4820 Inkjet Printer:

Just a printer.  Probably a really good one, but the Canon Pixma iP4700, and iP4600 are identical inside.

canon pixma iP4280 inkjet printer from Canon 7-20-09

Canon Pixma iP4820 Inkjet Printer.

Suprise! These printers use a new cartridge from Canon, the PGI-225 pigment black (larger black cartridge), and the CLI-226 color cartridges (including individual photo black, cyan, magenta, and yellow cartridges).  These printers use 5 individual ink cartridges total. These “new” cartridges are the same physical size and shape as the previous cartridges used in this printer series [iP4200, iP4300, iP4500, iP4600, iP4700] the CLI-221, PGI-220, however now there are new chips to deal with, and your old cartridges will not work in this “new” printer.

Ink Tanks Used: PGI-225 Pigment Black CLI-226 (Cyan/Magenta/Yellow/Black)

We expect these cartridges to look exactly like the current CLI-221, and PGI-220 cartridges.  You can bet the chips on the end of the cartridge are different.

Canon Pixma MP 280 (All-In-One) – $69.99

Canon pixma mp280 inkjet printer.

Canon Pixma mp280 - $69.99 list.

Cartridges used in the Canon Pixma mp280 include the 210/211 cartridges – stick with the XL version (full) of these cartridges:

Or The Full XL Cartridges:

This printer “does not” use individual ink cartridges. The black and color cartridges for this printer come in two different ink volumes, the standard fill (half full_ and the XL version of the cartridge (full).  The color cartridge (CL-221) has all three primary colors (cyan, magenta, and yellow) all in the same cartridge.  If you want a printer with individual ink tanks, check out the other offerings from Canon.

We are not big fans of single black and color cartridges with printers. Using a CISS, or CI system with OEM cartridges is a hassle as they ultimately wear out and need replacing.  Not a very aesthetically pleasing look.  On the other hand, individual ink tanks offer the possibility of CISS, CIS use, and generally have cheaper ink cartridge costs.

Canon PIXMA MP495 *Wireless* Photo AIO Printer:

Canon Pixma MP495 inkjet printer - used dual cartridges, not individual ink cartridges.

Canon Pixma MP495 Printer Wireless.

Cartridges used in the Canon Pixma mp280 include the 210/211 cartridges – stick with the XL version (full) of these cartridges:

Or The Full XL Cartridges:

The MP495 “does not” use individual ink cartridges. The black and color cartridges for this printer come in two different ink volumes, the standard fill (half full_ and the XL version of the cartridge (full).  The color cartridge (CL-221) has all three primary colors (cyan, magenta, and yellow) all in the same cartridge.  If you want a printer with individual ink tanks, check out the other offerings from Canon.

We are not big fans of single black and color cartridges with printers. Using a CISS, or CI system with OEM cartridges is a hassle as they ultimately wear out and need replacing.  Not a very aesthetically pleasing look.  On the other hand, individual ink tanks offer the possibility of CISS, CIS use, and generally have cheaper ink cartridge costs.

Press release here:

Review: Inside The HP 75XL, 75 XL Tri-Color (Color) Inkjet Print Cartridge (Cracked Open)

A look inside the HP 75XL tri-color (color) inkjet print cartridge.

The HP 75XL tri-color (color) ink cartridge is the “full” 75 color cartridge from Hewlett Packard that works in a variety of Officejet and Photosmart  inkjet printers. HP also offers a “half-full” version of this cartridge for $20-$25, simply the HP 75.  The HP 75XL is a good cartridge for the occasional printer and the cartridge can be had for $20 for the HP brand.  If printing at your location is 50-100 pages per month (no pictures), this cartridge is probably not a bad choice.  There are many other terrible choices (HP 92, HP 93, HP 60), and for the occasional photo, or documents in the 50-100 per month range, you could do much worse.

Look for printers that use the HP 74XL, and 75XL (often paired – black, color).  A good compromise for occasional printing.

HP 75XL, 75 XL tri-color ink cartridge.

Sponges are soaked in this cartridge.

A substantial amount of ink (in inkjet printer cartridge terms) is in these cartridges.  The sponges are full of ink.  The lid was (is) stuck on tight, so evaporation should be minimal. Refilling very easy with this cartridge, holes are already in the lid – covered by the cartridge identification number sticker.

HP Hewlett Packard - 75xl tri-color (color) ink cartridge.

Specifications:

Color: Black
Part Number: (CB338WN) – HP 75XL
Ink Type: Dye based color ink
Page Yield: 750 pages*

Ink Drop Size: 5pl

Retail price: $40.99
Street price: $19.99

* that 750 page estimate is from HP and based on 5% coverage (see what 5% coverage really looks like) – needless to say, manufacturer estimates are on the “high side.”

This cartridge is often paired with the HP 74 black, and 74XL black inkjet print cartridge which we cracked open here.

Cartridge Contacts

These solder points, or contacts help make up the print head. Printers that use these types of cartridges do not have an internal print head – rather the print head is located on the cartridges themselves. If print quality declines to the point where the cartridge is no longer usable, simply try another cartridge (it’s like getting a new printer). If your cartridge cannot be recognized, give the contacts a quick clean with a damp cloth, or other device and try again. If the contacts are harmed, the cartridge may not function at all.

HP 75xl tri-color ink cartridge print head contacts - keep them clean to refill your cartridge.

For Refillers:

Refilling is easy if you know where to fill. There are five (5) holes in the cartridge lid. As you can see from the other images, there is black ink around all five (5) of the holes. We suggest using the top most hole since it is closer to where the ink will exit the cartridge. Refill kits can be a hassle, but are worth it if you are on a tight budget and have patience.

HP 75xl color tri-color ink cartridge

HP 75xl color tri-color ink cartridge location of colors inside cartridge.

Is this an embedded expiration date?

Yet another 2D UPC code on the outside front of the cartridge. So that is 3 total on a single cartridge. If (HP) Hewlett Packard went to the trouble of putting them on there, you can bet they are there for a reason. HP claims there is no built-in “self-destruct” expiration date for their cartridges. Read more about it here…

http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?docname=c01764161&cc=us&dlc=en&lc=en

HP 75xl expiration date silk screened onto the cartridge - HP.com website says this is no big deal.

HP 75 And HP 75XL Compared:

There really is no comparison. The HP 75 black ink cartridge (on the left), or the “standard” cartridge as HP refers to it has two things wrong with it. First, the sponge is one-sixth the size as the 75 XL, and it is contained in a plastic divide to deter refillers.  Second, you can refill it, but look at what little ink the mini-sponge will take. The HP 75 “standard” cartridge will require constant attention to maintain it’s “full” status.

The HP 74 retails for $14.99, and the HP 74XL retails for around $33.99, but deals can be had on this older cartridge. If you print more than 50 pages per month, do yourself a favor and stick with the XL cartridges – they have more ink and are more re-fillable, and are a better cost per page value.

HP 74 black and HP 75XL tri-color ink cartridges compared.

HP 75xl color tri-color inkjet print cartridge compared t0 HP 74 black ink cartridge.

Tip – a better value is the HP 74XL black (21ml).  The HP 74 black ink cartridge contains a measly 5ml of ink.

Large capacity ink cartridges from HP - the HP 74XL black ink cartridge compared with the HP 75xl tri-color (color) ink cartridge.

HP 74xl (full) black ink cartridge compared to the HP 75xl tri-color ink color cartridge

Refill kits are available:

HP 75xl tri-color, color ink cartridge refill.As you can see from the images, this cartridge is very easy to refill. One negative to refilling is that the ink monitor will no longer function, so it is impossible to tell when the ink is going to run out. This is not a huge deal as the cartridge can be topped off every so often – never let a cartridge run all the way out. If the sponge can get dry, and if ink stops flowing properly the cartridge will not provide an acceptable print.

The HP 75XL cartridge is rated at 560 pages, so that equates to about 21ml of ink (7ml per color). The sponge is not all the way soaked as received from HP, however count on the cartridge taking at least 7ml of each color ink.  Refill kits are easy to use, and result in $3.00-$4.00 cartridges.

Compatible Cartridges:

HP 74, 74XL compatible ink cartridgesCompatible cartridges are an option for this cartridge. Basically a re-manufactured (compatible) cartridge is just a professionally refilled, or “refilled for you” cartridge. The will run about 30%-40% less than HP brand ink cartridges, and if you can find a quality vendor, contrary to HPs claims the work great.

These re-manufactured cartridges will get cheaper as more become available in the aftermarket. When you buy a new printer, more often than not, it will include new cartridges, and until these cartridges make their way into the 3rd party cartridge re-manufacturers the rice will be high. As the supply of quality empties increases, prices will decrease (in some cases by as much as 70%) and the compatible cartridge becomes a solid choice in the cost per page battle. Animated gif goodness.

Refilling HP ink cartridges - HP inkjet print cartridge refill locations for color HP 75xl tri-color ink carridge

The Print Head:

The printhead *will* wear out or get clogged, its just a matter of time. There is no hard data, but the accepted rule is a cartridge can be refilled 3-4 times before it needs to be replaced with a new one. A new “full” cartridge purchase is not always necessary (74XL retails for $. Empties can be had for cheap on eBay, so look there. Also check Amazon for a good selection of prices.

Unlike Epson, which makes the printhead part of the printer, Hewlett Packard (HP) puts the print head technology on the physical cartridge (for 80% of their consumer printers). This means every time you buy a new cartridge, it’s like getting a new print head. This is why these type of HP printers (that use this cartridge style) last forever in our opinion. As long as the mechanics of the printer keep working it will last forever since the print head can simply be replaced by installing a new cartridge into the printer.

Not all HP printers and cartridges use this style (print head on the cartridge) of build, but a large majority of the ones you will find at Wal-Mart, Target, and other discount retailers use these cartridges.

Notice the 2D UPC code on the print head ribbon. They are actually in three places on the cartridge – the top label, the print head, and on the front facing side (expiration).

HP 75XL printhead for inkjet print cartridge.

Hewlett Packard (HP) 75XL tri-color (color) ink cartridge page estimates:

http://h10060.www1.hp.com/pageyield/en-019/searchResults.html?cCode=us,st=cartridge,ss=CB338W

Hewlett Packard (HP) 75XL tri-color (color) inkjet print cartridge specifications:

http://h10010.www1.hp.com/wwpc/us/en/sm/WF06c/A10-12771-64199-69422-69422-3266753-3266779-3266784.html

This cartridge is compatible with the following HP Deskjet, Officejet, and Photosmart inkjet printers:

Cartridges: New Canon Ink Cartridges – CLI-226 Colors, PGI-225 Black

“Augmenting” the Canon ink cartridge line.

CLI ink cartridges from Canon have not really changed much over the life of the ink cartridge.

When any printer manufacturer releases new printers, it usually means new cartridges too.  Welcome the new CLI-226, and PGI-225 ink cartridges from Canon.

Pay me now consumerThis *also* means if you plan on “upgrading” in the next 6-8 months, make sure to use up all your current ink cartridges.  Canon invented the individual ink tank market with the old BCI-6, and BCI-3 ink cartridges – which were Canon’s flagship cartridge(s) for over 6 years.  Fast forward to 2010, and aggressive revenue generating plans have resulted in Canon releasing three (3) – three! – new ink cartridges in the past 3 years. The cartridges are ink tanks, nothing more; there is no “great technology” on the cartridge itself, so there is practically no reason to change the cartridge. Unless…the prevalence of compatible cartridge usage, refilling, and other 3rd party inking methods are getting more popular, and more widely accepted. Just asking.

Smart LED with Canon logo to let you know it’s installed correctly.

Should really read – special “microchip” attached so we can punish consumers by rendering the ink monitor useless if you want to refill your cartridge, and using scare tactics when it comes to 3rd party solutions.

Downgrading of the Canon ink cartridge

So the CLI-8 and PGI-5 cartridges needed “downgrading” by Canon to the CLI-221 and PGI-220 (very tiny) ink cartridges.  We now must welcome the CLI-226 and PGI-225 cartridges to the fold.  They look the same, act the same, and perform the same function as their predecessors. To bad the plastics are keyed differently and different chips are used.  No word on chip resetters for these cartridges.

PGI-225, and CLI-226 ink cartridges available on the Canon eStore:

Canon cli-225, and cli-226 inkjet print cartridges for the Pixma iP4280.

The PGI-225 pigment black (larger black cartridge), and the CLI-226 color cartridges (including individual photo black, cyan, magenta, and yellow cartridges).

New cartridges include the following.  The printers in this series typically use five (5) individual ink cartridges – the larger black cartridge (PGI-225) contains 19ml of pigment based black ink. The “colors” (CLI-226) which includes a photo black, cyan, magenta, and yellow cartridge contain 9ml ink, and are physically smaller than the PGI-225 cartridge.

Ink Tanks: PGI-225 Pigment Black CLI-226 (Cyan/Magenta/Yellow/Black)

Seems reasonable at first glance, but what about when you make a set – that is over $50.00 for a set of ink (essentially a black and color cartridge) – look at what they did the last time Canon changed cartridges:

New CLI-220 Canon cartridges are MUCH smaller than the previous CLI-8 series.

These cartridges are compatible with the following Canon inkjet printers:

Expect there to be shortages on these cartridges when these printers first hit the market in full.

Review – Opening The HP 74XL 74 XL (Full) Inkjet Print Cartridge (Cracked Open)

A look inside the HP 74XL black inkjet print cartridge.

A look inside the internal structure of an HP inkjet cartridge.  The HP 74XL cartridge is physically larger than the HP 74, or even the HP 75XL inkjet print cartridges.  It contains 21ml of ink, and is one of the best “cartridges” to use.  Cost per page printing is much improved with the HP 74XL ink cartridge from HP.  Look around for pricing – this is an older cartridge, and the $34.99 retail price can be beat.

Retail price for the HP 74XL inkjet print cartridge - black.

The HP 74XL inkjet print cartridge looks the same as the HP 96 (no XL designation but it was *the* cartridge to have not to long ago). The cartridge is physically larger than the cheaper (and about one-third the ink) HP 74 black ink cartridge, which we cracked open here.

Removing the top cover of the HP 74xl large black ink cartridge - a look at the internal structure of an inkjet printer cartridge.

Specifications:

Color: Black
Part Number: (CB336WN) – HP 74XL
Ink Type: Pigment based ink
Page Yield: 750 pages*

Ink Drop Size: 15pl

Retail price: $34.99
Street price: $19.99

* that 750 page estimate is from HP and based on 5% coverage (see what 5% coverage really looks like) – needless to say, manufacturer estimates are on the “high side.”

This cartridge is often paired with the HP 75, and 75XL tri-color inkjet print (color) cartridge which we cracked open here.

HP 74XL ink cartridge opened with lid off to reveal the internal structure of the cartridge.

Cartridge Contacts

These solder points, or contacts help make up the print head.  Printers that use these types of cartridges do not have an internal print head – rather the print head is located on the cartridges themselves.  If print quality declines to the point where the cartridge is no longer usable, simply try another cartridge (it’s like getting a new printer).  If your cartridge cannot be recognized, give the contacts a quick clean with a damp cloth, or other device and try again.  If the contacts are harmed, the cartridge may not function at all.

HP 74xl black inkjet print cartridge print head contacts.

For Refillers:

Refilling is easy if you know where to fill.  There are seven (7) holes in the cartridge lid.  As you can see from the other images, there is black ink around all five (5) of the holes. We suggest using the top most hole since it is closer to where the ink will exit the cartridge. Refill kits can be a hassle, but are worth it if you are on a tight budget and have patience.

Refill holes for the HP 74XL black inkjet print cartridge.

Is this an embedded expiration date?

Yet another 2D UPC code on the outside front of the cartridge.  So that is 3 total on a single cartridge.  If (HP) Hewlett Packard went to the trouble of putting them on there, you can bet they are there for a reason.  HP claims there is no built-in “self-destruct” expiration date for their cartridges.  Read more about it here…

http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?docname=c01764161&cc=us&dlc=en&lc=en

HP 74xl inkjet print cartridge expiration date on the actual cartridge itself!

HP 74 And HP 74XL Compared:

There really is no comparison.  The HP 74 black ink cartridge (on the left), or the “standard” cartridge as HP refers to it has two things wrong with it.  First, the sponge is one-sixth the size as the 74XL, and it is contained in a plastic divide to deter refillers.  Second, you can refill it, but look at what little ink the mini-sponge will take.  The HP 74 cartridge will require constant attention to maintain it’s “full” status.

The HP 74 retails for $14.99, and the HP 74XL retails for around $33.99.  If you print more than 50 pages per month, do yourself a favor and stick with the XL cartridges – they have more ink and are more re-fillable.

HP 74XL and HP 74 black ink cartridges compared.  HP 74XL is the way to go over the smaller HP 74 ink cartridge.

Refill kits are available:

Hewlett Packard HP 74, 74XL, XL Ink Cartridge Refills

As you can see from the images, this cartridge is very easy to refill. One negative to refilling is that the ink monitor will no longer function, so it is impossible to tell when the ink is going to run out. This is not a huge deal as the cartridge can be topped off every so often – never let a cartridge run all the way out. If the sponge can get dry, and if ink stops flowing properly the cartridge will not provide an acceptable print.

The HP 74XL cartridge is rated at XXX pages, so that equates to about 18ml of ink. The sponge is not all the way soaked as received from HP, however count on thee cartridge taking at least 18ml of ink. Refill kits are easy to use, and result in $3.00-$4.00 cartridges.

Compatible Cartridges:

HP 74, 74XL compatible ink cartridgesCompatible cartridges are an option for this cartridge. Basically a re-manufactured (compatible) cartridge is just a professionally refilled, or “refilled for you” cartridge. The will run about 30%-40% less than HP brand ink cartridges, and if you can find a quality vendor, contrary to HPs claims the work great.

These re-manufactured cartridges will get cheaper as more become available in the aftermarket. When you buy a new printer, more often than not, it will include new cartridges, and until these cartridges make their way into the 3rd party cartridge re-manufacturers the rice will be high. As the supply of quality empties increases, prices will decrease (in some cases by as much as 70%) and the compatible cartridge becomes a solid choice in the cost per page battle.

The Print Head:

The printhead *will* wear out or get clogged, its just a matter of time. There is no hard data, but the accepted rule is a cartridge can be refilled 3-4 times before it needs to be replaced with a new one. A new “full” cartridge purchase is not always necessary (74XL retails for $34.99. Empties can be had for cheap on eBay, so look there).  Also check Amazon for a good selection of prices.

Unlike Epson, which makes the printhead part of the printer, Hewlett Packard (HP) puts the print head technology on the physical cartridge (for 80% of their consumer printers).  This means every time you buy a new cartridge, it’s like getting a new print head.  This is why these type of HP printers (that use this cartridge style) last forever in our opinion.  As long as the mechanics of the printer keep working it will last forever since the print head can simply be replaced by installing a new cartridge into the printer.

Not all HP printers and cartridges use this style (print head on the cartridge) of build, but a large majority of the ones you will find at Wal-Mart, Target, and other discount retailers use these cartridges.

Notice the 2D UPC code on the print head ribbon. They are actually in three places on the cartridge – the top label, the print head, and on the front facing side (expiration).

HP 74xl black inkjet print cartridge, print head.

Hewlett Packard (HP) 74XL black ink cartridge page estimates:

http://h10060.www1.hp.com/pageyield/en-019/searchResults.html?cCode=us,st=cartridge,ss=CB336W

Hewlett Packard (HP) 74XL black inkjet print cartridge specifications:

http://h10010.www1.hp.com/wwpc/us/en/sm/WF06c/A10-12771-64199-69422-69422-3265895-3266274-3266279.html

This cartridge is compatible with the following HP Deskjet, Officejet, and Photosmart inkjet printers:

Cracked Open: Inside The HP 940 (C4902A) Ink Cartridge

Inside the HP 940 black ink tank cartridge.

Retail price of the HP 940 standard capacity ink cartridge.

Not a good buy - Check the HP 940XL - 3x's the amount of ink.

First off – look at this cartridge all you want, but buy the HP 940XL black – same cartridge, but “full” of ink.

The 940 cartridge from Hewlett  Packard (HP) comes in two different flavors.  The half-full 940 black ink tank, and the “full” HP 940XL black ink tank.  The 940 cartridges contain a very low amount of ink (22ml black – 10ml color) when compared to the 940XL which is completely full and contains a whopping 49ml of ink (16ml XL colors).

The HP 940 (which would include the entire 940 and 940XL series inkjet print cartridges for that matter), cartridge is not refillable (at least *we* do not see how it can be refilled).  There is a foil pouch inside the cartridge that compresses as the ink is used, and there is no obvious way to refill the cartridge.

This cartridge could also be called an ink tank, because that is exactly what it is – an ink holder.  There is no “revolutionary” technology on the cartridge, it simply holds ink.  The 940 series are basically the exact same cartridge design as the HP 88 series.

HP 940 – Black 22ml (1k pages)  $25.99

HP 940XL – Black 49ml (2.2k pages) $35.99*

*Can be had for less.  Much better cost per page rates with the XL cartridge.

Different type of HP cartridge – the ink tank:

HP 940 and HP 60 ink cartridges compared side by side 940 vs 60 print inks

These cartridges contain about the same amount of ink (940 16ml, 60xl 18ml est.)

The HP 940 series cartridges will only work in a select few printers, and consider yourself lucky if you own an HP (Hewlett Packard) Officejet 8000, or 8500.  You will still pay a premium for cartridges, however there are worse printers on the market – watch out on the ink.  As mentioned above, always get the XL black cartridge – a much better value.

The HP 940 is basically an ink tank.  There is no printhead on the cartridge (those are tucked inside the printer and must be replaced at about 10k pages print head).  Recently we have seen a few postings around the web discussing defective print heads – no matter the ink (HP original or compatible cartridges)  – so count on the print heads going out at least once.  They retail for $60.00 each ($120.00 total) so if you see them for less, pick some up.

Since all the hard work is done inside the printer – by the print heads – this cartridge is good at what it does, holding ink. The cartridge is entertaining to see dis-assembled for all of the engineering on the cartridge that is directed at making simple refilling impossible.

Simple Refill – Prevention:

Refill prevention is built into the cartridge with two distinct techniques.  One, a non resettable chip prevents “simple” re-use of the cartridge.  Currently there are no (none, zero, nada) HP 940 chip resetters on the market, so the chip cannot be reset.  Use of an “expired” chip in the printer is ok, and the cartridge will still function in the printer, however the ink levels will always be shown as empty.

Bottom side of the HP 940, 940XL, XL inkjet print cartridge - ink tank.

The chip can be moved to a full cartridge

Not easy – you need an xact-o knife, or something very sharp.  Do *not* mess around with a screwdriver as it will damage the chip.  If the chip becomes damaged it will no longer be recognized by the printer, and thus useless.  The chip on the HP 940 series looks identical to that of the HP 564 series we looked at here.

HP 940 back ink cartridge close-up of chip to be removed for use on chipless compatible

Chip is in there very tight. Use sharp and thin tool to remove.

Removing the bottom cover on the HP 940 Officejet Pro 8000, 8500 ink cartridge.

Removing the plastic cover from the bottom of the cartridge is easy enough – just cut the label where it covers the obvious seams – grasp with a firm hand, and it pops right off.  The internals of the cartridge can be removed (none of this helps to be able to refill the cartridge) – press the two tabs in, and the cartridge assembly slides right out.

HP 940 series black ink cartridge internal structure.  Internal parts on the HP 940 un-refillable ink cartridge.

HP 940 series black ink cartridge internal structure. Internal parts on the HP 940 un-refillable ink cartridge. Tabs.

Removing the cartridge assembly:

Internal ink container for the HP 940 series black inkjet print cartridge from Hewlett Packard.

All that is left is an empty shell.

Once the ink assembly has been removed, all that is left is the empty carcass of the HP 940 black ink cartridge.

HP 940 black ink cartridge empty shell.

HP 940 black ink cartridge empty shell.

Inside the HP 940 ink cartridge.

This cartridge is empty, all the ink has been sucked out of the internal pouch. the cartridge looks pressurized as the plastic covering has collapsed around the empty pouch.  The Black HP 940 cartridge contains 16ml of ink.  In contrast, the HP 940XL cartridge (same size and shape as this cartridge) contains 49ml of ink.

The cartridge could possibly be re-filled through the black ink exit hole (self sealing) with a needle and syringe, however not sure of the gauge required, and it would (maybe) be easy to puncture the internal bladder.

HP 940 black ink cartridge internal structure of the cartridge - can this 940 black ink cartridge be refilled?

HP 940 black ink cartridge internal structure of the cartridge - can this 940 black ink cartridge be refilled?

Cartridge not (easily) refillable…

We guess you could stick a refill needle where the ink exits the cartridge – self sealing access.

Inside the foil package there is a black pouch.  The foil like plastic is stuck to the black pouch with a very sticky backing.  It was very hard to get the two layers apart. Not really necessary to do this, however it is interesting to see that the pouch is “double sealed.”

HP 940 black ink cartridge internal structure foil pouch covers internal black pouch.

Cartridge Specifications (HP.com):

http://h10010.www1.hp.com/wwpc/us/en/sm/WF06c/A10-12771-64199-69422-69422-3777779-3777780-3777786.html

Page yield information about this cartridge series:

http://h10060.www1.hp.com/pageyield/en-019/yields/OJP8000A809_page.html?cCode=us

Since the 940XL black cartridge is a better choice click here to, compare prices on the HP 940XL ink cartridges.

Deal: HP Oficejet 8000 $55.00 Delivered – HP.com Website

Hewlett Packard Officejet 8000 injet printer on sale at the HP.com website

Most economical inkjet printer you can get? Has a black cartridge that is 49ml (940xl)

Officejet 8500 only $55.00

On the HP.com website, you can get the Officejet 8000 inkjet printer – with free shipping – for a low $79.99 after two $50.00 instant rebates – via this link – Use coupon code SVMB39487 to get an additional $25.00 off making the net price $54.99. Free ground Shipping.

Some of the gripes have been – its big, and loud. The SVMB39487 coupon code has restrictions.  It is $25 off $125 or more, and it expires 8-1-10.

Know what you are getting into:

A set of full cartridges (XL) will run $113, and a set of replacement print heads will run around $120.00.  Take a look inside this cartridge (940) here.

Full set of HP 940xl ink cartridges from the HP.com website.

Link:
http://www.shopping.hp.com/webapp/shopping/product_detail.do?product_code=C9297A%23B1H&aoid=35252

Good deal?

This is a good deal for the ink and print heads alone.  Included with the printer are 4 ink cartridges (940 series “half-full”), and more importantly there are two brand new print heads which retail for $59.00 each!

Print head pricing for the HP 940 series ink cartridge printers (Officejet 8000, officejet 8500)

HP Print Heads – HP 940 (Officejet 8000, Officejet 8500)

HP 940 Black and Yellow print head for HP Officejet

C4900A - HP Black and Yellow Printhead $59.99 list.

C4901A - HP Cyan and Magenta Printhead $59.99.

What you might not know about the printheads on this printer series is that there is a warranty usage limit of 560ml. After that, the printheads are out of warranty no matter the warranty status. Translation, if you print a bunch, there is a guarantee that HP will not warranty the printheads beyond the 560ml target.

Let’s take the HP 940 black and yellow printhead. Using the XL cartridges as a benchmark (49ml+16ml = 65ml) that would be around 8-9 cartridges used until the printheads are considered out of warranty (10-17k pages). You can see HP’s explanation here – http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?docname=c00206040&tmp_task=prodinfoCategory&lc=en&dlc=es&cc=pe&product=3564605&lang=es

So really consider your printing habits before purchasing any type of “extended warranty” for this printer series. If you plan on using a CIS, or CISS system with this printer (perfect candidate) the printheads will still need to be replaced at some point.